1942: the best single-stage engine

Discussion in 'Aviation' started by tomo pauk, Mar 22, 2012.

  1. tomo pauk

    tomo pauk Creator of Interesting Threads

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    What single-stage engine might be considered as the best blend of power and reliability, while not being too heavy and/or draggy for the power it delivers? The suitability both for bomber and fighter duties is also to be taken in consideration. The engines that are in production are the contenders; in other words - no prototypes.
     
  2. wuzak

    wuzak Well-Known Member

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    Wow Tomo, this time you're casting a really wide net.

    Some of the contenders would be:

    Great Britain: Rolls-Royce Merlin 20-series, Rolls-Royce Griffon, Bristol Hercules and Napier Sabre
    United States: Allison V-1710, Pratt Whitney R-2800, Pratt Whitney R-1830, Wright R-1820, Wright R-2600 and Wright R-3350 (in production in 1942?).
    Germany: Jumo 211, Daimler-Benz DB601, Daimler-Benz DB605, BMW 801.

    There are probably others, but these I would think are the main ones.

    In terms of the best from each country I would pick the Griffon for the UK, the R-2800 for the US and the DB605 for Germany.
     
  3. tomo pauk

    tomo pauk Creator of Interesting Threads

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    What about DB-603 - production-vise it fits in 1942 at least as good as Griffon (maybe better?), and it's better in high altitudes. In second half of 1942 the BMW can fully operate at 'Notleistung', so that is a contender too.
    My favorite is the R-2800 so far :)
     
  4. wuzak

    wuzak Well-Known Member

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    Was the DB603 in production in 1942? I thought it wasn't.
     
  5. tomo pauk

    tomo pauk Creator of Interesting Threads

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    I have the handbook that covers 0, 1st and 2nd series of the DB-603, issued in November 1942. Any firm data about the 603 in 1942 is welcomed :)

    When the Griffons for Spit XII were produced?
     
  6. wuzak

    wuzak Well-Known Member

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    In 1942, no doubt - since the XII started service in early 1943.
     
  7. tomo pauk

    tomo pauk Creator of Interesting Threads

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    Indeed; I was looking after more accurate dates :)
     
  8. Shortround6

    Shortround6 Well-Known Member

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    With the rapid development of engines (and aircraft) during WW II even 11-12 months can show considerable differences. 1942 seems to be a rather pivotal year. For example in Jan you have the R-2800 in the A series with a single stage supercharger available in some numbers with the B series engines just starting production but the 2 stage engines, both mechanical and turbo are only around in prototype form. By the end of the year the both two stage engines are in full production and the A series has been out of production for months.

    The Griffon only shows up in production form in the last couple of months and then in small numbers (a hundred or so?)

    While the Sabre is certainly in production in numbers the question is when did it achieve a really acceptable level of reliability.
     
  9. davebender

    davebender Well-Known Member

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    U.S. Strategic Bombing Survey Aircraft Division Industry Report
    Except for a few hundred prototypes and pre-production engines I don't think the DB603 was mass produced prior to 1943.

    I'll throw in a plug for the 1,340 hp Jumo 211F engine. Not too bad for a 1942 engine that was reliable, fuel efficient and relatively inexpensive to produce.
     
  10. tomo pauk

    tomo pauk Creator of Interesting Threads

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    If we can consider Griffon for 1942, than the "few hundred prototypes and pre-production [DB-603] engines" surely fits there, too.

    Single stage R-2800 (B series, of course single stage) is my contender here, closely followed by BMW-801D.
     
  11. Shortround6

    Shortround6 Well-Known Member

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    The single stage Merlin is in contention.

    The non-turbo Allison is not.

    The Hercules and R-2600 don't have the supercharger or low drag needed for a single engine fighter. Great as they performed in bombers and twin engined strike fighters.

    The Jumo 211 was a good engine but had made little progress since late 1940/41 and was a bit behind in the power race, second best is second best regardless of price.
     
  12. davebender

    davebender Well-Known Member

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    RLM ordered 120 pre-production DB603 engines during 1940. I don't have numbers for 1941 and 1942 but they were probably similiar for each year.

    Junkers built 289 prototype and pre-production Jumo 222 engines, mostly during 1941 and 1942. Do they count also? The 2,000 hp Jumo 222A would be a sure winner during 1942.
     
  13. tomo pauk

    tomo pauk Creator of Interesting Threads

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    Jumo 222 does not fit in one of major categories:

    I've said already, if we discount the 603 for 1942, we can pretty much discount the Griffon, too. The Germans have BMW-801 as contender.
     
  14. davebender

    davebender Well-Known Member

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    How do you figure that? It's overall superior to 1942 versions of the R2800 engine. There were all sorts of German aircraft designed for the Jumo 222 engine.

    I don't think a couple hundred engines count as mass production. But if that's the standard then how can we exclude the Jumo 222?
     
  15. tomo pauk

    tomo pauk Creator of Interesting Threads

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    It's this category:

    that makes Jumo 222 as an ill choice for this thread.
     
  16. Shortround6

    Shortround6 Well-Known Member

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    We can exclude it because it never went into a service aircraft.

    Rolls-Royce built a little over 300 Peregrine engines and that number kept 2 squadrons of twin engined planes in service for over two years.

    A little under 300 Jumo 222s kept ZERO aircraft in service for ZEROdays.

    Something more than politics was going on.
     
  17. wuzak

    wuzak Well-Known Member

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    I don't think the Jumo 222 and DB603 count because they were not in series production, even if as many of them were built as the Rolls-Royce Griffon which was in series production.

    Pre-production is just that - preparing for production, but not actually part of that production. Akin to service test aircraft, if you will.
     
  18. tomo pauk

    tomo pauk Creator of Interesting Threads

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    Do we have the numbers produced for Griffon and Db-603, yearly at least? The engine was produced (not only) for Me-410, and here is what Wikipedia says about the 410:

    No difference when compared with Spit XII.
     
  19. wuzak

    wuzak Well-Known Member

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    I believe all 100 Spitfire XIIs were completed in 1942. They went into operational service in early 1943. Not sure when the first delivery was.

    If the Me410 was being delivered in January 1943, it is probable that the DB603 was in production, rather than in the pre-production stage.

    I was going off what other posters had said.
     
  20. Vincenzo

    Vincenzo Active Member

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    the production of XII continued since october 1942 to september '43
     
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