Aircraft part or bomb or rocket part?

Discussion in 'Technical Requests' started by AN/TRC-7, Jul 6, 2011.

  1. AN/TRC-7

    AN/TRC-7 New Member

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    #1 AN/TRC-7, Jul 6, 2011
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2011
    Calling all aircraft bomb fuze and aircraft part experts. Came across one of these the other day, been told its an arming device for an aircraft bomb but looking at the manuals i can't find anything, so i assume it could be for a missile.
    I did have a look at the Delco company and they made aircraft parts, fuses and even bits for the atomic bomb during WW2. The device has a 27 volt dc motor that has twin motor shafts, the device also has two barometer cylinders either side that when opened under atmospheric pressure pushes the shaft with rubber end which rotates the mechanism the other way. On its full cycle when it runs for a few minutes it rotates three main shafts that fit into something, these come to a stop and can no longer move because of a lug on a cog that stops the device, i assume its a one way action like a bomb fuze used for a single job and not used over and over again or could i be wrong. Any cues?
    unident7.JPG unident1.JPG unident2.JPG unident5.JPG
     
  2. superkeith1872

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    Could you post more information from the tag, part numbers, mfg date etc? This is a neat piece and I'm curious as well. Keith
     
  3. AN/TRC-7

    AN/TRC-7 New Member

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    delco1.JPG delco4.JPG delco3.JPG
    Close up on the tag part number and stamp, no date unfortunately.
     
  4. superkeith1872

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    I looked through my Army Air Force part manual that covers all armament related parts and couldn't find anything similar. I also used search engines for the part number and other data combinations with no luck. I'm out of options but I hope it gets figured out, I"m very curious. If it goes on a vintage military aircraft, give it some time, the guys on here are your best bet to figure it out. Keith
     
  5. splib1

    splib1 New Member

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    It appears to be one of the drive motors and bellows driving the directional clutches from a T-1 Bombsight computer. See the part circled in red in the photo below.
    [​IMG]
     
  6. AN/TRC-7

    AN/TRC-7 New Member

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    Many thanks spilb1 for that information:D. What aircraft used the T-1 bombsight computer? Is there any other information regarding the T-1 bombsight.
     
  7. splib1

    splib1 New Member

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    #7 splib1, Jul 24, 2011
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2011
    The Sperry T-1 Bombsight was the US adapted and built version of the RAF Mk XIV bombsight (which was used on Lancasters, etc). I believe the T-1 was installed on Lend-Lease B-24 Liberators that the US provided the RAF as the Norden Bombsight was too sensitive to be provided even to Allies. I haven't been able to find much about the operational history of these sights, but I do have manuals and other technical information if you have any specific questions.

    Theses sights have fascintated me for several reasons when compared to contemporary bombsights:
    1 . They used a collimated crosshair projected on a glass, much like a fighter gunsight, instead of the telescope used on the Norden M-9, Sperry S-1, or the wire sights used on the RAF Course Setting Bombsight and US Estoppey D-8. This means that the bombardier can get a wider field of view than he could get with his eye stuck on a telescope.
    2. They required the bombardier only to input the bomb terminal velocity, wind speed and direction, target elevation, and the barometric pressure at the target. The other key variables of airspeed, altitude, and heading were taken directly from the aircraft. This meant the pilot could fly an evasive course, and the computer could recalculate the bombing formula automatically without the bombardier having to refer to tables or calculators (as was done with the Norden prior to the implementation of the Automated Bombing Computer)
    3. They used high pressure air as the driving force in the computer. The bellows sensed pressure changes and moved blades that cut streams of pressurized air. The piece that you have used pressure changes from elsewhere in the computer to expand and collapses those small bellows, thus moving the clutch to engage the motor to spin the gear train that drives the sighting angle in either direction.

    As much as the T-1 was a fascinating technical achievement, it apparently lacked the Norden's famed accuracy, and did not have its innovative autopilot to allow the bombsight to fly the plane directly. Perhaps this obsolence is why there doesn’t seem to be much operational history on these.

    I hope this helps.
     
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