Archery

Discussion in 'Sports Talk' started by Trebor, Aug 19, 2010.

  1. Trebor

    Trebor Well-Known Member

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    hey guys, I've been a fan of Archery for a while ever since I started doing it a little bit in middle school (it was part of Physical Education) but I haven't drawn a bow since then. since I started playing my Wii sports resort (which includes archery) it re-sparked my interest. and I'm wanting to do target shooting. but I don't know what kind of adult beginner bow I should get. I can't do Cabela's cos they practically want your arm. I looked around and learned a couple of different types. I'm looking at traditional bows
     
  2. lesofprimus

    lesofprimus Active Member

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    So u dont want to go with a compound then, want to stay in the recurve/long bow area Rob???

    Im in the process of teaching my 2 young sons how to shoot at the moment on a youth compound bow...
     

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  3. Bucksnort101

    Bucksnort101 Well-Known Member

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    #3 Bucksnort101, Aug 19, 2010
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2010
    Oh yeah another Traditional archer on the forum!!! I sold my compound several years ago after taking up Traditional Archery. Can be frustrating at times, but I just like to see an arrow fly downrange and hit the mark. I currently shoot a Longbow since it seems I shoot them better, some guys shoot Recurves better, but I think it's all in what you are comfortable with.
    Suggestions I would make it to visit a local archery shop that carries some Traditional gear and have then check your draw lenngth. Second don't overbow yourself, meaning don't get a bow that is too heavy of a draw weight. From bow builders I've spoken with 45-50 is what most people buy these days, gone ar the days of he-men shooting 70-80 pound Longbows.
    Third, buy a longer bow. Short bows are less forgiving to form issues and are harder to shoot for most people to shoot accurately. I'd probably stay with a Recurve at least 60-62" long if you have a 28" draw length, or a Longbow of at least
    62" for the same draw length.
    I would refrain from buying a used bow of e-bay as well as I've heard of many people getting the raw end of the deal, twosted bows, cracked limbs etc.
    Drop me a P.M. if you have any questions. There are several Traditional Archery sites I can tell you of, one of which has a really nice spot to buy and sell used bows and such, and they are pretty much standout guys and I've heard of very few problems with people buying used bows from members.

    P.S. Some Trad Bows can get just as expensive as the Compound stuff depending on what wood combinations and how fancy you want them.
     
  4. herman1rg

    herman1rg Well-Known Member

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    Find a local Arhcery club where you can learn in safety and try various types of bow to find which suits you best.
     
  5. Glider

    Glider Well-Known Member

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    This is the best suggestion of all. The club will almost certainly have training bows for you to use and get the style right and you will be able to try the different types of shooting to find what is best for you.
    If you are lucky the club may have discounts with the local shops so you can save money when you purchase the bow, arrows and the rest of the kit.

    Remember it isn't just the bow, to get the best out of the equipment the arrows should be purchased with the bow and you will be able to try the arrows to obtain the best match.

    Do not buy the equipment first.
     
  6. Bucksnort101

    Bucksnort101 Well-Known Member

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    I agree that it's best to try equipement before buying, but if you are going to go with Traditional Stlye equipement it will make things a little trickier. Most Archery clubs I've been to may have a few old recurves and longbows, and some newer low end stuff that will not give you a true idea of what the best for you is.

    I would try to see if there is a Traditional Archery shop, or a good archery shop that carries some Trad equipement so you can feel and shoot some bows. A really good web-site for Traditional Archery is Tradgang.com, join up, costs nothing. Read some of the threads, post a message looking for any help in your area. There are shooters from all over the US that will be happy to offer help. I've met several people in my home state at the range and given them some assistance.
     
  7. Trebor

    Trebor Well-Known Member

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    I found an archery shop, but it's MILES from my house. I'd have to have someone drive me there :p
     
  8. Bucksnort101

    Bucksnort101 Well-Known Member

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    I'd offer to drive you, but I think you are a several hundred miles from me;) I do recommend you go to the Traditional Web-Site I listed before (Trad Gang.com) and introduce yourself and ask if there is anyone in your area that would mind giving you a helping hand and letting you try out a bow. From my experience Traditional Archer and a great bunch of guys (as are WWII Aviation enthusiast) and would be more than happy to give you a hand.
     
  9. Trebor

    Trebor Well-Known Member

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    thanks buck. but the thing is...I'm not into hunting...like at all. hate it as a matter of fact. I just wanna shoot stationery targets
     
  10. Trebor

    Trebor Well-Known Member

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    say, I just thought of this. would it be possible to make one, myself? my stepfather just started getting into woodworking, and it might be possible to make one for myself.
     
  11. Glider

    Glider Well-Known Member

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    No, not unless you know exatly what you are doing. The strain on a bow is significant and when they go its pretty impressive and you can get bits of wood flying around your head at great spead.
     
  12. lesofprimus

    lesofprimus Active Member

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    Saw a guy dry shoot a recurve one time, the limbs shattered sending piece of wood and laminate into his forearm.... Lots of stitches and 3 operations later and he was still messed up....

    Dont get ahead of urself Rob, take ur time to figure out which archery style and bow ur gonna dedicate the time to man...
     
  13. Bucksnort101

    Bucksnort101 Well-Known Member

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    I agree, don't just willy-nilly try to build a bow. If you want to build a laminated wood/fiberglass bow you need to have an oven to cure the glue used to bind everything together, plus build a form to lay everything up on and so forth. By the time you end up buying all the supplies to build everything you have nearly as much spent on supplies as you do to just flat out buying a bow.
    If you insist on buidling one, try to find someone that has done so, again the web-site I told you of is has lots of people to offer a hand, they are not all about hunting so don't worry about that if you are not into it.
    Do a google search on Binghams Projects, they sell kits and videos on laminated bow making and have proven designs that will work straight from the start.
    If you are thinking of just building an all wood bow (Primitive) I would tell you not to start with that. There is a lot more work involved and much harder to get a shootable bow. Plus they sometimes tend to break a little more readily.
    Thirdly, I accidently dry fired a 3 piece Recurve once. Made an sickening sound as it split and broke in half. Figured it was a weak spote in the riser wood. Don't get scared away by this though as it is a rare occasion that a bow flies apart, usually they come unhinged when the are abused and not treated well.
    One thing you may want to look into is finding a bow maker that will let you test shoot one of thier "in stock" bows. Many Bowyers (people who make bows) will send a bow to you to try out before puchasing. Pay a little down to have them send you a bow, then you get your money back when you return it if you don't like it.
     
  14. Trebor

    Trebor Well-Known Member

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    you guys are right. building one is a lil too risky. I guess I'll have to suck it up and add a traditional bow to the list of things I need to save up for. a car and a new comp are tied for first.
     
  15. Bucksnort101

    Bucksnort101 Well-Known Member

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    There are some cheaper, korean and Japanese built bows that are of pretty good quility and reasonable priced. Samick comes to mind. I have a buddy that bought an in-expensive recurve for his girlfriend. Don't recall the name but I'll check and see if he knows.
     
  16. Glider

    Glider Well-Known Member

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    #16 Glider, Aug 27, 2010
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2010
    If you are determined to buy a bow then I would suggest the Samick Polaris training bow. Its very important that you get the technique correct before going on to a more powerful bow. If you don't, its quite possible to hurt yourself.

    One of the benefits of going to a club is that they are likely to have the training bows for you to learn on. That way when you do purchase a bow, it will be one that will last you some time.
     
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