Badger 250 Airbrush

Discussion in 'Painting Questions, Tutorials and Guidebooks' started by tigerdriver, Oct 27, 2010.

  1. tigerdriver

    tigerdriver Member

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    I picked up one of these on ebay for a tenner

    Was this a huge mistake or will it be ok ? it came with a aerosol pack which will do me for now.

    It looks much less snazzy than the all metal jobs with the cup i see pics of here, and i am worried i will have to mix a whole load more paint than i will want to use to make an impression on the bottle :(
     
  2. tigerdriver

    tigerdriver Member

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  3. Crimea_River

    Crimea_River Well-Known Member

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    A great starter brush for doing large areas that don't require a fine touch (like free-hand mottles or soft edges). Badger has been making airbrushes for decades and are still doing so. Once you master this one you may want to move up but you should get some good years out of it. Good buy.
     
  4. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    I used one of those for many years, buying my first one, as a kit including some bits and pieces, when they were around £50 !!
    It was used mainly for large areas, and single colour applications, and was fine. Yes, you need to mix more paint than in the gravity feed types, as the feed tube needs to be immersed in the medium, but it's not too bad overall.
    With a bit of practice, you can get down to a line about 4 mm wide, and it'll just about cope with a heavy Luftwaffe mottle in 1/32nd scale - anything smaller requires a fine-line 'brush.
    It's a good basic 'brush, or more correctly, a mini- spray gun, and works well. the biggest disadvantage is the cleaning of the jet and nozzle, and the limitations on control, but these are not major issues.
    Until about 18 months ago, I used propellant cans, then bought a cheap, basic compressor. The latter pais for itself after about two models, as the cans drop-off in performance as they empty, and of course quite a bit of air is used in testing the paint viscosity, and for cleaning.
    Bottom line is, it's a good general-purpose 'brush, and I'm thinking of getting one of the cheap copies, just for large areas and things like clear coats.
     
  5. tigerdriver

    tigerdriver Member

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    sounds promising , thanks for the feedback guys


    I will have a go with this for a while , and then look at compressors and a finer gun once i have got the hang a bit

    i do like luftwaffe camo but dont have the skils yet
     
  6. Crimea_River

    Crimea_River Well-Known Member

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    If you know anyone with an old fridge they're getting rid of, I've heard the compressors in those are great for airbrushes - and super quiet.
     
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