British Z Battery Anti-Aircraft Rockets

Discussion in 'Weapons Systems Tech.' started by stug3, Mar 3, 2013.

  1. stug3

    stug3 Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2010
    Messages:
    854
    Likes Received:
    53
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    I never knew these existed.


    Anti-aircraft rockets or Z Battery manned by the Home Guard on Merseyside, 6 July 1942.
    [​IMG]


    Home Guard soldiers load an anti-aircraft rocket at a Z Battery on Merseyside.
    [​IMG]


    Anti-aircraft rockets (known as a Z Battery) at Bootle, Liverpool, January 1942.
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Capt. Vick

    Capt. Vick Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2008
    Messages:
    7,895
    Likes Received:
    638
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Long Island, New York
    What the...man you really learn something new everyday here don't you! Great! Any confirmed kills?
     
  3. stug3

    stug3 Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2010
    Messages:
    854
    Likes Received:
    53
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    Not really sure Capt. Vick, these pics are the first Ive ever seen of these things. From this account of a 1943 bombing raid they may have been in somewhat common usage.

    ...the radio went off at about 8pm. My mother and father told my aunt, who was living with us in Old Ford Road, to go to the shelter. My aunt and I were walking along Old Ford Road when the searchlight came on, it went on to an aircraft and that is when anti-aircraft guns started firing. The rocket guns in Victoria Park also fired.

    Alf Morris
     
  4. Capt. Vick

    Capt. Vick Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2008
    Messages:
    7,895
    Likes Received:
    638
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Long Island, New York
    Victoria Park? Is that in London? This is so wild!
     
  5. stug3

    stug3 Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2010
    Messages:
    854
    Likes Received:
    53
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    Yes, London. I would guess they were'nt very effective.
     
  6. Capt. Vick

    Capt. Vick Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2008
    Messages:
    7,895
    Likes Received:
    638
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Long Island, New York
    I can't believe none of our English cousins have chimed in yet!
     
  7. michaelmaltby

    michaelmaltby Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2009
    Messages:
    3,919
    Likes Received:
    630
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Toronto
  8. Shortround6

    Shortround6 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2009
    Messages:
    9,770
    Likes Received:
    801
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    retired Firefighter
    Location:
    Central Florida Highlands
    Perhaps because they would like to pretend it didn't exist? :)

    Another example of British Weaponry of the weird and wonderful variety.
     
  9. Capt. Vick

    Capt. Vick Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2008
    Messages:
    7,895
    Likes Received:
    638
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Long Island, New York
  10. stug3

    stug3 Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2010
    Messages:
    854
    Likes Received:
    53
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
  11. yulzari

    yulzari Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2010
    Messages:
    777
    Likes Received:
    76
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Occupation:
    Gentleman
    Location:
    Limousin
    #11 yulzari, Mar 5, 2013
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2013
    If you want to look up more Home Guard weaponry try Googling Blacker Bombard, Smith Gun, Northover Projector, Sticky Bomb or Auxilliary Units. Also fougasse and punt guns were part of my grandfather's Home Guard defence plan.

    Z batteries were commonplace to bulk up AA fire and were manned by Home Guard who had spent the day working unless they were young enough to be at school or old enough to be retired.

    You can still see mounts for many of these still in place today just as you can pillboxes and anti tank defence works.
     
  12. Shortround6

    Shortround6 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2009
    Messages:
    9,770
    Likes Received:
    801
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    retired Firefighter
    Location:
    Central Florida Highlands
  13. stona

    stona Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2009
    Messages:
    7,528
    Likes Received:
    947
    Trophy Points:
    113
    There is a Victoria Park in London,but also very many other British cities. It's sort of like Trafalgar Road,Albert Street or Cambrai Drive,we often name streets or roads (or pubs,how many Lord Nelsons are there?) all over the country after an event or person to be celebrated.

    The raid referred to may well have been on London,but that is not a given:)

    A battery could fire a salvo of 128 unrotated projectiles (UPs). Each carried an 18 or 22 pound warhead, depending which reference you believe.

    [​IMG]

    Problems with accuracy are evident in the photo above,shortly after the rockets have cleared their launchers.The rocket batteries were judged to be less effective than conventional anti aircraft artillery and were not deployed in large numbers. Whether they ever shot anything down or not I know not.

    Cheers

    Steve
     
  14. Shortround6

    Shortround6 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2009
    Messages:
    9,770
    Likes Received:
    801
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    retired Firefighter
    Location:
    Central Florida Highlands
    The AA rockets were supposed to use a "warhead" that consisted of " fin-stabilized 7 inches (18 cm) diameter rocket out of the tube to a distance of about 1,000 feet (300 m) where it exploded and released an 8.4 ounces (240 g) mine attached to three parachutes by 400 feet (120 m) of wire. The idea was that an aeroplane hitting the wire would draw the mine towards itself where it would detonate".

    While the wires certainly increased the target area the parachutes could cause the "Mine" to drift to unexpected locations.
     
  15. yulzari

    yulzari Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2010
    Messages:
    777
    Likes Received:
    76
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Occupation:
    Gentleman
    Location:
    Limousin
    Shades of the Long Aerial Mine. When the Handley Page Harrow went to war in 1940/1941.
     
  16. stona

    stona Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2009
    Messages:
    7,528
    Likes Received:
    947
    Trophy Points:
    113
    That's a different system isn't it?

    It sounds similar to the parachute and cable system fired in nine round salvoes which used 480 feet of cable and initially deployed one parachute at the top of the wire. When an aircraft struck the wire the shock caused another parachute at the lower end to open,the combined drag being enough to cause the aircraft to stall. No explosives were used (apart from the launch rocket) in this system.

    The UPs fired in salvos by the Z batterys had an effective maximum altitude of 19,000 feet,according to the British anyway.

    Cheers
    Steve
     
Loading...

Share This Page