Can some of the explanation for the P-38's greater success in the Pacific be attributed to poorer Japanese pilots? (1 Viewer)

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GrauGeist

Generalfeldmarschall zur Luftschiff Abteilung
In 1945, the Germans told their Flak gunners, "If they're silver, they're American, if they are green, they're British, and if they're invisible, they're ours."
Unfortunately the German flak crews didn't get the memo before Operation Bodenplatte.
 

Shortround6

Major General
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Jun 29, 2009
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See;

Note the main page.
** Time to climb to 20,000ft.............................................7.6 minutes
** 5 minutes at 1150hp per engine, 2.9(?) minutes at 1000hp per engine.

now on the chart 5 minutes will take the plane to 14,000ft starting at 3000fp and ending at 2600fpm.
Cutting the throttle to 2600rpm cuts the rate of climb to 2200fpm at 14,000ft and the plane will be climbing at 1950fpm at 20,000ft.

However if the plane was cruising at 20,000ft and the throttle was slammed forward the P-38F could climb at around 2300fpm.

Like a lot of things sometimes the performance numbers are taken out of context. Sometimes due to laziness, sometimes in an effort to keep things simple (but winds up confusing people) and sometime because the writer has an agenda and is trying to prove a point.
 

Wild_Bill_Kelso

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The stealth aircraft carrier and stealth fighters and bombers were a huge success in terms of their main goal- stealth. The problem is the project, known as Raumtransitschnellevernichtungüberlegenekraft was too successful. Using a method similar to the high energy space-time shift attempted during the infamous "Philadelphia Experiment" in the US, the German hardware and crews were actually sent into another parallel dimension, from which they could see all their targets while remaining completely invisible and also totally safe from Allied attack, but it turns out their bombs and bullets remained in the alternate universe and failed to have any impact on Allied targets. Worse, the aircraft, ships and crews remained stuck in the alternative dimension through the end of the war... some say they are still there, lost and forlorn...
 

FLYBOYJ

"THE GREAT GAZOO"
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Ok what was it called exactly then? What was the difference? It was combat unit for transitioning into the P-38 right?
There were training squadrons stateside and they were designated as such. Once deployed operational units may do in-unit training for in theater familiarization or aircraft transitional training but they were still an operational combat unit and once it was determined that the unit was combat ready, they flew operational missions.


OTU is a British term,
 

FLYBOYJ

"THE GREAT GAZOO"
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In the 5TH AF, one squadron from the 8th FG, 49th FG, and 35th FG transitioned to P-38s in late '42 - early '43. Pilots had previous combat experience in P-39s (8th and 35th) or P-40s (49th). They also culled the other squadrons of some of their best pilots. 475th FG was stood up in much the same way, culling experienced pilots from other groups.
OTUs were used Stateside when standing up new units.
But they were dedicated training squadrons and I don't think they ever used the term "OTU."
 

FLYBOYJ

"THE GREAT GAZOO"
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I thought the 475th FG was basically a P-38 training unit that was also a fighting unit...
Noooooo - it trained up and then went into combat with fangs fully exposed!

In just two years of service, from August 1943 until August 1945, the 475th Fighter Group completed 3,042 missions and shot down 551 enemy aircraft

1671249219986.jpeg


 

Greg Boeser

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But they were dedicated training squadrons and I don't think they ever used the term "OTU."
Operational Training Units were set up in 1942 to stand up combat groups. They consisted of a cadre of flying and ground instructors to train up units preparing for overseas deployment. Later these were converted to Replacement Training Units when the priority shifted to maintaining strength in units already deployed.
 

FLYBOYJ

"THE GREAT GAZOO"
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Operational Training Units were set up in 1942 to stand up combat groups. They consisted of a cadre of flying and ground instructors to train up units preparing for overseas deployment. Later these were converted to Replacement Training Units when the priority shifted to maintaining strength in units already deployed.
Yes - point being they were not operating in theater
 

Wild_Bill_Kelso

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Wasn't the 475th FG the one that Lindburgh and the other Lockheed reps went to to teach them improved maintenance and flying techniques with the P-38? The whole low rpm high manifold pressure trick for better fuel economy?
 

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