Eviation First Flight

MIflyer

1st Sergeant
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6,880
May 30, 2011
Cape Canaveral
From Avweb. "Electrify the skies" If it gets struck by lightning is that a recharge?

"Eviation's all-electric Alice aircraft successfully completed its first flight on Tuesday at Washington's Grant County International Airport (MWH). The Alice "technology demonstrator" flew for eight minutes, reaching an altitude of 3,500 feet. The company reported that the flight, which tested propulsion system and fly-by-wire system functions, went according to plan.

"We have successfully electrified the skies with the unforgettable first flight of Alice," said Eviation President and CEO Gregory Davis. "People now know what affordable, clean and sustainable aviation looks and sounds like for the first time in a fixed-wing, all-electric aircraft. This ground-breaking milestone will lead innovation in sustainable air travel, and shape both passenger and cargo travel in the future."

Eviation plans to offer the Alice in commuter, executive and cargo versions and is currently planning to begin deliveries in 2027. For the Alice, the company is targeting a top speed of 160 knots, 250-NM range with a 30-minute reserve and maximum useful load of 2,500 pounds for the nine-passenger commuter variant and 2,600 pounds for the cargo version. The design is powered by two magniX magni650 electric propulsion units and features an advanced fly-by-wire system, flight controls and avionics by Honeywell. As previously reported by AVweb, Eviation has orders for the Alice from companies including Cape Air, GlobalX and DHL Express."

Screenshot 2022-09-28 at 14-13-15 Eviation Alice Completes First Flight - AVweb.png
 

MIflyer

1st Sergeant
4,534
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May 30, 2011
Cape Canaveral
I wonder if these electric aircraft designers have given any thought to EPUs? For example on the F-16, which uses a fly-by-wire control system, loss of the engine means loss of electric power and thus loss of control. The F-16 had a Emergency Power Unit that uses a Hydrazine cartridge to run a small motor that provides enough power to at least try to get the thing on the ground in one piece. If an electrically powered aircraft runs out of juice and has a fly by wire control system, at that point not only does the airplane have a unplanned landing in its immediate future, but the pilot becomes merely an observer, at best recording the crash with his cellphone.
 

GrauGeist

Generalfeldmarschall zur Luftschiff Abteilung
If it's battery powered, I doubt the fly-by-wire system would be affected with a motor failure.

What is interesting, though, is how many commuter or connecting flights are 250 miles or less?

Los Angeles (LAX) to San Francisco (SFO) is 337 miles, the distance between Las Vegas (LOS) and Sacramento (SMF) is 397 miles, so it's market would be limited in many parts of California.
 

gumbyk

Master Sergeant
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If it's battery powered, I doubt the fly-by-wire system would be affected with a motor failure.

What is interesting, though, is how many commuter or connecting flights are 250 miles or less?

Los Angeles (LAX) to San Francisco (SFO) is 337 miles, the distance between Las Vegas (LOS) and Sacramento (SMF) is 397 miles, so it's market would be limited in many parts of California.
Those distances are Statute miles. LAX to SFO is 293 NM, still outside the range, but not too far.

In New Zealand it would cover a lot of the regional routes currently done by DHC-8's. These are 250nm ranges from NZ's main international airports.
Screenshot 2022-09-29 160557.png


I was in a meeting this morning with Sounds Air who have signed a letter of intent with another company developing an electric aircraft that will have more seats, and longer range. Remember, these will be first generation electric aircraft. Take a look at what first generation jet aircraft were like, compared to where we are today.

Regarding FBW back-up - aircraft with any single-source power supply have to have a backup. Aircraft with electronic magnetos need a back-up battery for that system. Even exit signs need back-up batteries. So I don't see how the FBW would be any different.
 
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gumbyk

Master Sergeant
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Apr 2, 2009
Blenheim
Wouldn't the most feasible back-up be an ICE?

Those are in the works, and will most likely be the solution, with bio-fuels for the APU.

However, I still think there's a need for the battery backup. Under current certification standards triple redundancy is required for airliners, which is why they've got the Ram Air Turbine to cover loss of both engine hydraulic power supplies.
 

MIflyer

1st Sergeant
4,534
6,880
May 30, 2011
Cape Canaveral
In FL we recently had the first pilot earn his private license using an electric powered aircraft.
 

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