Explosive rounds

Discussion in 'Weapons Systems Tech.' started by Haztoys, May 10, 2008.

  1. Haztoys

    Haztoys Member

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    How do explosive rounds and shells work..........:oops: ...I'm sure theres many ways of doing it ...Always wanted to know..Thanks
     
  2. kool kitty89

    kool kitty89 Well-Known Member

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    Well there's this Shell (projectile) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Komet weapons: MK 108 cannon


    And on guns: The WWII Fighter Gun Debate: Gun Tables


    And an interesting note on unfuzed HE rounds (using sensitive explosives) particularly used by the Japanese, hence why they managed to devise a fairly practical 7.7 mm (.303) HE round:
    .303 British - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    [​IMG]

    However using such fillers as straight PETN for the main charge in such small rounds is dangerous and can risk explosion in the gun (either by the shock of firing, overheating of the gun, damage or fault to the round/gun, or a mix of these) or detonation of the magazine from a hit from enemy fire.

    Although PETN (penthrite, or nitropenta) was one of the main HE fillers for German HE rounds.
     
  3. merlin

    merlin Member

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    I went to the Wiki link to British 0.303", and I amazed at the lack of reference to the Dixon incendary ammunition (usually referred to as de Wilde).

    Captain Dixon (responsible for small arms ammunition) was entrusted to handle to the conversion of the de Wilde ammunition to British manufacturing processes. Unfortunately, the was hand-made with no quantifiable measures of the ingredients - i.e. a pinch of this followed by a pinch of that.

    Hence, Dixon (without instruction or permission) found his own solution. And, just in time too, as without such ammo IMO the 0.303's wouldn't have been as effective as there were (and 'effective' is debateable anyway with so many damage aircraft making it back).

    The Dixon design, kept the name 'de Wilde' to lull the Germans into a false sense of sercurity because they new all about. the 'de Wilde' weren't too happy - but the payment they recieved satisfied them. And the US also benefitted as the design was virtually given to them as reverse lend-lease.
     
  4. kool kitty89

    kool kitty89 Well-Known Member

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    Didn't the Dixon round become the Mk.VI incendiary round? (which was then copied and simpified for US .30-06 and .50 BMG and then copied again by the Brits to create the Mk.VII incendiary)

    From Tony Williams: 1.JmA.net :: View topic - DeWilde ammunition
     
  5. merlin

    merlin Member

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    Yes, I agree with the Tony Williams extract - though I thought the Dixon/'de Wilde' bullet was more effective than 'twice' that of the previous incendary/tracer bullets.
    I'd have to re-read the precise I did, of an article on Dixon, a by E.C.R. Baker.

    I re-read the wiki reference - and to me (judging by the years it quoted in relation to the Mk No's), it only seemed to refer to British Army 0.303 ammo!

    Although Tony, referred to Major Dixon (he got rapid promotion during the war in recognition of his services), I think it a travesty that 'de Wilde' is still used in publications - often without the appostrophy. It's almost, as if the German WW1 ballons were referred to as Montgolfier ballon rather than a Zepplin!!
     
  6. kool kitty89

    kool kitty89 Well-Known Member

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    There's some mention of the Mk.6/7 incendiaries (Mk.VI/VII), but none specifically about Dixon (or De Wilde)

     
  7. Soren

    Soren Banned

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    Regarding the MV of the MK108, it varied from 505 m/s to 525 m/s depending on the round fired, while rate of fire was 650 rpm, which is pretty darn fast.
     
  8. kool kitty89

    kool kitty89 Well-Known Member

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    Ok, but that wasn't brought up here, but one thing: didn't the German system for recording MV actually used the velocity at the muzzle, opposed to allied testig which was for some distance after. (I can't remember the specifics)

    And 650 rpm is excellent for a weapon of that callibur (even if you take to low MV into account it's good) but: The WWII Fighter Gun Debate: Gun Tables
    :shock:
     
  9. Soren

    Soren Banned

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    The Germans measured the MV some distance from the barrel as-well KK, and it's still std. practice to do this.

    Furthermore that site has got the MV for the 7.92x57mm round all wrong, the muzzle velocity was 890 m/s with the 10.5 gram projectile and 865 m/s with the 11.5 gram projectile.
     
  10. kool kitty89

    kool kitty89 Well-Known Member

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    I noticed some of that too. (mostly for the German guns, also in the MG FF/M, MG 151/20, and Maybe MG 131)
     
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