Hawker Typhoon Car Door Throttle Quadrant.

Discussion in 'Other Mechanical Systems Tech.' started by abaddon1, May 11, 2014.

  1. abaddon1

    abaddon1 Member

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    'Er... perhaps you remember that I said in my Hawker Typhoon electrical systems post that the throttle quadrant restoration for the Jet Age Museum's Typhoon Cockpit was next?

    Now THIS is what I call a challenge!... and it looks as though this will call for me to need to change all my little grey cells up to "S" gear... (fully Supercharged!)

    It has to be done; because Tiffie throttle quadrants are rarer than Bigfoot!
    (The only one I've ever seen commercially available was going for the asking price towards the thick end of twenty-five hundred Pounds Sterling.)

    But now... the horror story in pics...

    Throttle Quadrant  Internals Pre-restoration.jpg
    These are the top plates and internal bits of the quadrant as unearthed from the fire dump at 5MU Kemble after almost fifty years interment. (The remains of the prop control and throttle levers are just a teeny bit bent!)

    Throttle Quadrant Outboard Casting. Internal View.jpg
    This is an inside view of the quadrant outboard casting and lever assemblies as fitted in the recovered junk-yard cockpit section.
    (But, at least it still retains its two shafts, bushes; landing lights, and supercharger control levers.)

    Throttle Quadrant Outboard Casting.jpg
    The other side of the outboard casting with the fuselage frame attachment points.

    Throttle Quadrant Inboard Casting. Pre-restoration.jpg
    The somewhat moth-eaten quadrant inboard casting complete with missing section and rather fetching crack that almost matches up. (Just to make it more fun!... but, again, the shaft bushes are still in place.)

    Wish me luck, Guys!
     
  2. Wurger

    Wurger Siggy Master
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    Good Luck !!!
     
  3. abaddon1

    abaddon1 Member

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    #3 abaddon1, May 15, 2014
    Last edited: May 16, 2014
    Typhoon Car Door Port Services Panel.

    Meanwhile... whilst scratching my head as to how I'm going to tackle the above bunch of junk; I have pressed on with the Port Undercarriage and Engine Services Panel...
    Here's the raw material...
    2.  Undercarriage Selector and Start-Slow-running Panel. Pre-restoration.jpg
    The rather mangled upper panel.

    1. Lower Radiator and Wing Flaps Control Panel Pre-restoration.jpg
    The not-quite-so-mangled lower panel.

    1. Start and Slow-running Control Unit. Pre-restoration.jpg
    The Start and Slow-running cut-out assembly.

    1. Undercarriage Selector Lever Quadrant. Pre-Restoration..jpg
    The Undercarriage Selector Lever Quadrant.

    2. Undercarriage Selector Lever Pre-restoration.jpg
    Undercarriage Selector Lever (Somewhat Moth-eaten!)

    Port Services Panel Restored.jpg
    And... The final outcome. (Except for filling the legend on the throttle lever knob...
    I just hope the throttle quadrant eventually will look as good!)
     
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  4. abaddon1

    abaddon1 Member

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    Disregard the first two postings on this subject... seems there were a few Gremlins in the ether today!
     
  5. Wurger

    Wurger Siggy Master
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    Please edit your post and upload your pictures again because the attachment above is of invalid tags.
     
  6. abaddon1

    abaddon1 Member

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    Meantime; here is the completed Port Undercarriage and Engine Services Panel with the Radiator Shutter and Wing Flaps operating levers and associated Hydraulic valve blocks and interconnecting pipework in place.
    (This actuating lever and valve block assembly has been made up from the best parts of three donor assemblies... The original ex-junkyard example; and two excavated examples.)...
    Port Undercarriage and Engine Services Panel Complete.jpg

    and the associated Hydraulic block interconnecting pipes...
    4. Common Pipe Connections Assembled.jpg

    Still trying to figure out how to make good the pitted and corroded Magnesium alloy castings for the throttle quadrant... they're too far gone to use as moulds; so I guess some form of filling is the order of the day... it just depends on what will adhere to the magnesium.
     
  7. abaddon1

    abaddon1 Member

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    An update on the Throttle Quadrant.

    The castings are now pretty much finished. The inboard casting was repaired using Scotch-Weld 2216 Epoxy Adhesive and three small rectangles of 18swg aluminium on the inside face of the casting. The corrosion pitting was filled with Autocare Easy Sand Car Body Filler... cheap as chips; and actually gives a smoother finish than Plastic Padding and the like.
    The outboard casting was similarly filled, and re-studded using sawn-down period 2BA long shank bolts; which were then re-threaded to take period Air Ministry Simmonds 2BA nuts... an unopened box of which we found in deep storage (A rusty old filing cabinet in the corner of the workshop.)

    Thanks to Air Ministry (UK Forum) for information on the guts of the Quadrant... the putting together of which will be the next bit of fun!.

    Here it is in its coat of primers...

    Throttle Quadrant Casting Repair - Inboard Face..jpg
    The Inboard Face.
    Throttle Quadrant Casting Repair - Outboard Face..jpg
    The Outboard Face with mounting brackets.

    Looks a tad better than when we started!
     
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  8. Crimea_River

    Crimea_River Well-Known Member

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    You're doing a great job. Let me know if you have one for a Mosquito laying around. We're in need of one for our restoration.
     
  9. abaddon1

    abaddon1 Member

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    #9 abaddon1, Jun 13, 2014
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2014
    The Throttle quadrant is now well on the way to completion. Just a few tweaks and the pics will follow.
     
  10. abaddon1

    abaddon1 Member

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    #10 abaddon1, Jun 13, 2014
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2014
    The Throttle quadrant is now pretty well finished... save for the correct Propeller pitch lever knob which we don't have. A temporary knob has been fitted for effect. The restoration has taken a total of four weeks... and much cursing, penetrating oil; sanding, filing and band-aids.
    Here is the result...

    Inboard face
    1. Throttle Quadrant. Inboard.jpg

    Outboard Face.
    2. Throttle Quadrant. Outboard.jpg

    Top Face.
    3. Throttle Quadrant Top.jpg
     
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  11. Crimea_River

    Crimea_River Well-Known Member

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  12. rochie

    rochie Well-Known Member

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    great stuff, just need the tiffy to go around it now !
     
  13. abaddon1

    abaddon1 Member

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    Well, we've got a bit of one! For the details, see:
    Jet Age Museum - Hawker Typhoon Mark 1a/1b

    The rest of the team are working on the frame tubes...
    Typhoon Project Frame Structure.jpg

    and I'm doing the innards of the cockpit that the pilot plays with!

    Cockpit Section.jpg
    The proposed exhibit covers the area within the red lines.
     
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  14. rochie

    rochie Well-Known Member

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    brilliant !

    Terry (airframes ) and i have talked about visiting the museum at some point, initially to see the Javelin as i believe that airfix used yours to measure up for their 1/48 kit that we both have in the pile ready to be built !
     
  15. abaddon1

    abaddon1 Member

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    And Now... back to the usual suspects.
    With the port and starboard side panels and the throttle quadrant complete; it's time for the easier bits. Next victim is the W/T Remote controller...
    3. Pre-restoration (3).jpg

    This one is not as bad as it looks. If you ever wondered what was inside; it's this...
    4. Radio Control Box Initial Dis-assembly.jpg

    And after a little de-rusting and rectification...
    4. Restoration Complete (2).jpg

    Next Victim?... The Mk XI Oxygen Regulator. (1943 Vintage.) because the Mk VIIID is completely screwed!
     
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  16. rochie

    rochie Well-Known Member

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    More fine work !

    Guessing the four red buttons gave four channels for the radio ?
     
  17. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Excellent work !
     
  18. abaddon1

    abaddon1 Member

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    The push button functions are as follows:

    OFF... Self explanatory!

    The common uses of the four remaining channels were as follows:

    "A" channel was usually used for all normal plane-to-plane communication or for plane-to-ground communication with a Controller.

    "B" channel was common to all VHF-equipped control towers. It was normally used to contact the control tower for takeoff and landing instructions.

    "C" channel was frequently used in contacting homing stations.

    "D" channel was normally used for plane-to-ground contact with D/F stations, and as a special frequency which was automatically selected at regular intervals by the action of a contactor unit. ("Pip-Squeak" IFF.)
     
  19. rochie

    rochie Well-Known Member

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    thanks for the explanation
     
  20. abaddon1

    abaddon1 Member

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    Next major cockpit equipment lump to tackle is the Rudder Bias and Tail Trim gearbox and wheels.
    Fortunately, our example has an intact 10 inch Tail Trim wheel, which was also fitted to the Lancaster. These Aeroplastic A.S.102 wheels are rarely found intact.
    Turning the wheels transmits movement to two gear sprockets which, in turn operate chain drives to the respective control surfaces.
    The Rudder Bias wheel operates a right-angled drive comprising a straight-cut bevel gear arrangement; the crown bevel gear driving the main shaft and the pinion driving the operating wheel.
    The scale indicator arrows comprise a pair of curved blades; connected; and pivoting at their lower ends in a manner similar to a pair of engineering calipers. Each blade is fitted with a small spigot which runs in a pair of parallel machined discs attached to the respective Rudder Bias and Tail Trim shafts; each shaft disc being machined with a reducing concentric spiral channel. Thus; as the control wheels are turned on their shafts; the blade spigots slide in their respective channels, reducing or expanding the blade arcs of travel, and indicating their positions on the external scale plate by means of the right-angled arrow-headed ends of their respective blades.
    All In all, it is a very sophisticated example of British engineering ingenuity.
    Here are the before, stripped down and final restoration pics.
    1. Trim Wheel Units.jpg

    2. Trim Wheel Components.jpg

    6. Rudder  Tail Trim Wheels Assembly (2).jpg

    Unfortunately, the Legend plate is a tad moth-eaten; but we don't have a spare. so it will have to do for now!
     
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