Hurricane Servicing Markings

Discussion in 'Aircraft Markings and Camouflage' started by coldkiwi1, Jan 9, 2011.

  1. coldkiwi1

    coldkiwi1 New Member

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    We have one of the replica Hurricanes that was used in the original Battle of Britain film.

    We are currently updating the paint scheme ( 43 sqn) and want to apply the servicing detail markings.

    Can anyone help with the detail of the markings? Wording, size and location?

    The aircraft is on display out the Omaka Aviation Heritage Centre in New Zealand Omaka Aviation Heritage Centre Blenheim, New Zealand

    Thanks

    Mike
     
  2. Wurger

    Wurger Siggy Master
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    Maybe this can help....
     

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  3. antoni

    antoni Banned

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    Ask your questions on this forum where you will find the people that restore and repaint warbirds.

    Historic Aviation - Key Publishing Ltd Aviation Forums

    Ignore the above diagrams they are full of errors.

    Components had to be marked with the material specification of the paint used. Under the specification was a letter S if the paint was synthetic or C if the paint was cellulose. This was because it was not allowed to repaint components with a different type of paint. At the time of the battle of Britain DTD 308 matt cellulose and DTD 314 matt synthetic were used for camouflage. Fabric areas were painted with cellulose dope DTD 83 or DTD 83A. Later in the war other finishes were used.

    According to the above diagram the Hurricane was painted DTD 305 which the material specification for 30 ton steel tubes suitable for welding and the Spitfire DTD 715 which is free cutting corrosion-resistant steel (for nuts). DTD 517 was a quick drying synthetic matt resin primer and finish.

    CX stands for Cellon X and the numbers are probably Cellon's own specification. (Cellon were a dope manufacturer.)
     
  4. Wurger

    Wurger Siggy Master
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    Sorry but I can't see any DTD 305 marking on the Hurricane. The Spitfire here isn't for the answer to the post.
     
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