Ju-87 sirens

windhund116

Senior Airman
360
217
Jul 3, 2017
Could the pilot disable the sirens, when in level flight? Or was the crew stuck hearing the thing through the entire mission?

Thanks! [drawing from Ju87 Stuka. Baginskis and Watanabe. Zokeisha Publications. 1982. Inner cover page].

Ju-87 Stuka siren drawing (small).jpg
 

Wurger

Siggy Master
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Jun 19, 2005
Poland
As memo serves he certainly could. However it often wasn't possible entirely. So the sound was generated all time while getting back after the attack was accomplished. It was a reason for getting them dismounted.
 

fubar57

Lieutenant General
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Nov 22, 2009
The Jungles of Canada
They were air driven and may have come on at a certain speed, as in a dive. Apparently they could be switched off but I've only found one source saying it was possible.They dropped the speed of the Ju 87 by 10-15km/h. and when speed means life, the later variants discontinued it. From the one source, it says that bombs were introduced that had a siren attached to the fins that made a wail but I've never seen a photo
 

windhund116

Senior Airman
360
217
Jul 3, 2017
They were air driven and may have come on at a certain speed, as in a dive. Apparently they could be switched off but I've only found one source saying it was possible.They dropped the speed of the Ju 87 by 10-15km/h. and when speed means life, the later variants discontinued it. From the one source, it says that bombs were introduced that had a siren attached to the fins that made a wail but I've never seen a photo

Certainly an advantaged to ground anti-aircraft crews.
 

Csch605

Airman
48
13
Oct 21, 2018
I believe is was speed activated as the Stuka dove the airspeed got the point where the Trumpet of Jericho was heard clearly. The Stuka was notoriously slow in level flight particularly with bombs and fuel loads. I remember watching a special on cable that over 300 miles and hour it started. If there was a kill switch I do not know.
 

pbehn

Lieutenant Colonel
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Oct 30, 2013
Residents of London, Hull, Berlin and Hamburg were eternally grateful that the bombs didn't have whistes attached, that would have been too much.
 

GrauGeist

Generalfeldmarschall zur Luftschiff Abteilung
The Jerico Trumpet had an electronic clutch that engaged when the dive-autopilot was engaged.
When the pilot regained control after the dive and disengaged the dive switch, the clutch released the siren drive and the siren prop free-wheeled once again.

Occasionally, the clutch malfunctioned and the Stuka's crew had to listen to it all the way back to base.
 

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