No material restrictions on Jumo 004, jets a year early?

Discussion in 'Engines' started by wiking85, Feb 27, 2015.

  1. wiking85

    wiking85 Well-Known Member

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    According to Wikipedia:
    Junkers Jumo 004 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Without the material restrictions on the Jumo 004A could it have seen service introduction in 1943 rather than 1944? Reading up on the use of Cromadur to replace Tinadur (basically alloyed steel parts instead of the nickel alloys)caused all sorts of delays due to the need to incorporate cooling refinements and of course alter the manufacture of the blades themselves due to different vibration patterns. Would the original prototype have been available a year earlier without having to use other materials?
     
  2. GregP

    GregP Well-Known Member

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    The British and Americans would have had to put their own jets into combat. No difference in eventual outcome.
     
  3. wiking85

    wiking85 Well-Known Member

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    I'm not asking that; I curious to know how much the material restrictions delayed the Jumo engine.
     
  4. davebender

    davebender Well-Known Member

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    I'd guess at least 18 months.

    Jumo 004B was essentially a new engine design which had many technical problems associated with the hollow turbine blades.
     
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