Two of The Last F-4 Phanthoms Perform Low Pass Jet Flybys at EAA AirVenture 2016

Discussion in 'Post-War' started by SHARKBITEATTACK, Mar 15, 2017.

  1. SHARKBITEATTACK

    SHARKBITEATTACK New Member

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    Little vid I made that I wanted to share :)

     
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  2. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Nice - thanks for posting.
     
  3. pbehn

    pbehn Well-Known Member

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    Brings back memories of seeing them all over Yorkshire, before they brought in the 250 ft (200?) rule for low flying. One went over a village fete so low and fast we heard it coming about 3 seconds before it passed over, I am sure some of the old dears needed a change of garments.
     
  4. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Yep, I remember the RAF Phantoms very well. Once, on the ramparts at Bamburgh castle, in the mid 1980's, a German Phantom suddenly appeared out of the sea fret (low-lying mist) at around 500 feet altitude, closely followed by a RAF Phantom, at around 250 feet, both climbing to clear the castle !
     
  5. pbehn

    pbehn Well-Known Member

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    #5 pbehn, Mar 15, 2017
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2017
    When was the rule brought in? At times on the North Yorkshire moors, which is almost completely flat, they seemed between 20 and 50ft. Scared me to death when they swooped up out of a valley.

    Up in Bamburgh sea fret is called "haar".
     
  6. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Not sure when the 250 feet rule was introduced (I think mid 1990s), but in the North Sea ranges area, I often saw various military aircraft well below 250 feet over the sea.
    From the 1950's up to the early 1990s, I used to spend quite a lot of free time at Warkworth, where my folks had a place. Many memories of sitting on the sand dunes, watching Hunters blasting away at a drogue towed by a Meteor, in the '50s, through to Buccaneers heading back to Lossiemouth, and Phantoms and Jags, along with stuff from other NATO forces, flying back and forth.

    The 'haar' is more of a cold fog, whereas a 'fret' is more of a summer mist, but yes, 'haar' is often used in the Northumbrian dialect, along with many other words that our former Colonial cousins would puzzle over !
    Pull up a cracket hinny, and I'll tell yasall an aarful story .........
     
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