1. herman1rg

    herman1rg Well-Known Member

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    I remember quite a while ago someone posted that it was a shame that completed models still have perfectly round tyres with no squashing.

    So I have two questions (maybe three)

    Firstly has anyone got a pic of a model showing tyre squash.

    Secondly what would be the best method for achieving that effect on the parts supplied in kits ( what might be seen as the third question is it possible to buy tyre mouldings with squash moulded in)
     
  2. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    To answer your last question first, yes. There are many resin wheel accessory sets availble as 'weighted tyres', from most of the major resin suppliers, covering many (but not all) of the most popular model types, and in most scales. I've just bought a set of 'True Details' wheels for a 1/48th scale Tempest - but only due to the kit wheels being plain and totally inaccurate.
    There are two basic ways of achieving a 'weighted' or 'flat' look to model tyres, given that they are plastic and not rubber or vynl.
    The simplest, and safest, is to simply file and sand a 'flat' spot on the tyre, and this is probably the most common method.
    The other option, which will also create a slightly bulged look, is to press the tyre onto a heated surface, to flatten the area, and at the same time slightly bulge the side walls. As you can probably appreciate, the latter has to be done very carefully, and on a gentle heat, as there is a very real risk of ruining the whole component.
    Depending on the scale of the model, a sanded flat spot is normally more than adequate, giving a 'footprint' and eliminating the perfectly round appearance. It's a good idea to take into account the type of aircraft, how the tyres looked on the real thing, and the conditions and environment. For example, a fully loaded Lancaster, standing on concrete, would show a slight bulge on the lower tyre wall, where a Spitfire, on grass, might not show any bulge, and the 'flat spot' might not be visible.
    Here's an example on my unfinished 1/32nd scale Beaufighter. Only a very slight 'flat' has been filed onto each tyre, as the model will eventually be displayed on a base simulating a sand covered desert airfield. If it was to be on a hard standing, a slightly 'heavier' flat area would have been added. As the Beau didn't seem to exhibit much in the way of a 'bulge' to the tyres, no attempt was made to replicate this but, rather than using heat, a slight bulge could have been buit up and moulded using Milliput two-part epoxy putty, rather than risk the assembly being damaged by the heat treatment, or the joint of the two halves of the wheel separating, leaving an annoyong, and difficult to correct hole!
    Hope this helps.
     

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  3. muller

    muller Active Member

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    I've only bought one set of resin wheels ever, they were for my SEAC GB A-20. They had some bulge! But i figured an RAAF A-20 would, those Aussies are big chaps! ;) See the bulge and flat spot on the nose wheel thats been removed. Resin wheels are fairly cheap too.

    [​IMG]

    Love the sand on those tyres Terry! 8)
     
  4. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Thanks Keith!
    Yes, some aftermarket 'weighted' tyres can be a bit over the top! But as keith stated, they're not particularly expensive, averaging around £2 to £3 in the UK.
    I've just checked on a recently purchased kit, and one bought about six years ago, both of which included 'weighted' tyres. The 'newe'r kit is in fact the 1998 issue of the Hasegawa Typhoon Mk1B (car door) which has slightly bulged, weighted tyres, and the older , already built kit is the Academy P47D. This kit included three sets of wheels/tyres, displaying 2 of the different hub patterns and tread patterns, but only one set of wheels were weighted, allowing a 'landing' or 'taking off' configuration if required. Both kits are 1/48th scale BTW.
     
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