World War two aircraft wing loading

Discussion in 'Technical Requests' started by Panda-Ball, Feb 13, 2008.

  1. Panda-Ball

    Panda-Ball New Member

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    Does anyone know a good site with information on World War two aircraft wing loading or as anyone out there already done the research. Thanks
     
  2. Thorlifter

    Thorlifter Well-Known Member

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    Wiki has the wing loading for many of the ww2 planes, but not all. For example:

    (from wikipedia)
    P-51D Mustang

    * Drag area: 3.80 ft² (0.35 m²)
    * Aspect ratio: 5.83

    Performance

    * Maximum speed: 437 mph (703 km/h) at 25,000 ft (7,620 m)
    * Cruise speed: 362 mph (580 km/h)
    * Stall speed: 100 mph (160 km/h)
    * Range: 1,650 mi (2,655 km) with external tanks
    * Service ceiling 41,900 ft (12,770 m)
    * Rate of climb: 3,200 ft/min (16.3 m/s)
    * Wing loading: 39 lb/ft² (192 kg/m²)
    * Power/mass: 0.18 hp/lb (300 W/kg)
    * Lift-to-drag ratio: 14.6
     
  3. drgondog

    drgondog Well-Known Member

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    You are right of course but important to note that the wing loading given here is for one weight condition - a gross weight of about 9165 pounds which was about right for a 51D with internal fuel, oil, pilot and ammo.

    That same 51D over Posnan Poland with all wing tanks, all fueslage tank and some internal wing fuel burned off would have a lower wing loading like maybe 34 (or therabouts) #/SF wing loading.. and on takeoff with two 110 gallon tanks plus all internal fuel is 'sluggish' and closer to 10,800 pounds is closer to 45#/Ft>>2.

    So, the closer to home a Mustang was on the return trip, the more dangerous it would be from a pure performance point of view (ignoring a tired pilot).. in acceleration, climb, turn and dash speed.
     
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