Double or Single Act Air brush for a Newby?

Discussion in 'Painting Questions, Tutorials and Guidebooks' started by Sir Francis, Sep 11, 2007.

  1. Sir Francis

    Sir Francis New Member

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    What do you guys recommend for a first timer Double / Single action. I've heard many people recommend single action, but others say it isn't much different.

    What about Compressors-is a more expensive quiet hobby model worth it or just go with a cheap Bunnings job.

    Im thinking about getting a Sparmax DH103. Any advice?

    Cheers
     
  2. Wayne Little

    Wayne Little Well-Known Member

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    Personally, I like my double action airbrush I like to have control over both air and paint, but I still use an old fridge compressor with a water trap, given to me by my father in law some 20 years ago and still going....
    You need to look at various options and advice before going ahead, but buy something decent to start with provided your wallet can stand it, and practice practice practice!!
     
  3. Thorlifter

    Thorlifter Well-Known Member

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    yup. Opinions will vary. For a nube, you may find a single action less intimidating. Double action will give you more control.
     
  4. Wurger

    Wurger Siggy Master
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    I'm with Wayne.There is a small difference between the double and single action airbrushes.But it doesn't matter really.It's up to your "financial possibilities" only which one you take.It would be nice if you could buy an additional 0.2mm nozzle to exchange for the 0.3mm one.It will give you possibility of painting of both big surfaces and small ones.The 0.2 mm nozzle is really good for much more accurate colouring.As far as a compressor is concerned I use the compressor built in the same way like Wayne's one was.If you don't have an old fridge compressor you can buy a new one in a shop.Most important is its air pressure.For acrylic paints the pressure from 1,5 to 3,3 atm. is enough, for oil enamels like Humbrol's for instance,I suggest a bit higher one up to 5 atm.So if a compressor is able to give an air pressure from 1 to 5 atm and you have a possibility of regulate this it means it is a good one.Certainly your airbrush has to work with this range of the air pressure.Ah... what is more, the compressor should be a piston one but not a membrane device.These piston ones are better at stable air pressure ( Wayne's compressor has been working well for almost 20 years ).It is also important if there isn't an air tank in the device.
     
  5. Sir Francis

    Sir Francis New Member

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    Ok thanks guys, don't mind paying extra for a double if its worthwhile, but don't want to be put off if its tricky to use compared to single.
    Compressor-wise I was thinking about noise, as I might like to use it inside (in the study) Don't really want to spend too much time in the cold dingy garage.
    cheers
     
  6. DOUGRD

    DOUGRD Member

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    Well Sir Francis, I guess it's up to me to even things up here. If this is your first airbrush I recommend the single action simply because it is less complicated and if your trying to learn technique and proper paint mixing proportions etc. then you really don't want to complicate things right off. I used a Badger single action for 3 or 4 years before I got a double action. It's kind of like riding a bike. Start off with a tricycle and then once you've mastered that go on to a more challenging model. The old fridge sounds like a good idea and may I suggest an airtank and a water trap? The air tank (which I made out of an empty propane tank) will take the pulsing out of the air source and provide a more even supply. The water trap will remove any moisture from your supply and it's really easy to make. I took an old bottle with a metal top and soldered two brass tubes into the top. Use tubes that will fit your air line of course. then I put a paper towel inside the bottle and Ta-Dah DONE! Place it in your air supply line just prior to your airbrush and you're good to go. I hope this helps without mucking up the waters for you.
     
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