Ejercito del Aire (Spanish Air Force)

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  1. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    #1 gekho, Apr 5, 2010
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2011
    The Spanish Air Force (Spanish: Ejército del Aire; literally, "Army of the Air") is the air force of Spain. It is one of the 3 branches of the Spanish Armed Forces and has the mission of defending the sovereignty and independence of Spain, its territorial integrity and constitutional freedoms, within airspace of Spain and its territories as well as to maintain the international security in operations of peace and humanitarian help. The present Spanish Air Force was not formed until October 7, 1939, at the end of the Spanish Civil War. The EdA was a successor to the Nationalist and Republican Air Forces. During World War II, one air section, the "Blue Squadron" (Escuadrilla Azul), operated alongside the Blue Division (Division Azul). The Blue Division was a Spanish volunteer group which fought alongside the Axis Powers on the Eastern Front. During the first years after WWII the Spanish Air Force consisted largely of German and Italian planes and copies of them. An interesting example was the HA-1112-M1L Buchon (transliteration: "big throat"), this was essentially a licensed production of the Messerschmitt Bf 109 re-engined with a Rolls-Royce Merlin for use in Spain. Although in sheer numbers the EdA was impressive, at the end of WWII technically it had become more or less obsolete due to the progress in aviation technology during the war. For budget reasons Spain actually kept many of the old german aircraft operative well into the 50´s and 60´s, as an example the last Junkers Ju-52 transport plane was not retired from service until 1972.

    On March 18, 1946, the first Spanish paratroop unit was created. It participated in the Ifni War during 1957 and 1958. In this campaign many old axis aircraft still saw service such as the Junkers 52 or the Heinkel 111 (nicknamed "Pedro") and others. Links were established in the 1950s with the United States. Spain received its first jets, like the F-86 Sabre and Lockheed T-33 together with training and transport planes like the T-6 Texan, DC-3 and DC-4. This first age of jets was replaced in the 1960s by newer fighters like the F-104 Starfighter, F-4C Phantom and F-5 Freedom Fighter. The organization and equipment of the Spanish Air Force was again modernised in the 1970s to prepare for Spain's membership of NATO in 1982. Planes like the Mirage III and Mirage F1 were bought from France and became the backbone of the Air Force during the 1970s and part of the 1980s until the arrival of the American F/A-18 which participated in the Bosnian War and the Kosovo War under NATO command, based in Aviano, Italy. The Spanish Air Force is replacing older aircraft in the inventory with newer ones including the recently introduced Eurofighter Typhoon and the Airbus A400M airlifter, both manufactured with Spanish participation. Its aerobatic display team is the Patrulla Aguila, which flies the CASA C-101 Aviojet. Its helicopter display team, Patrulla Aspa, flies the Eurocopter EC-120 Colibrí.
     

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  2. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    #2 gekho, Apr 5, 2010
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2011
    The North American Aviation F-86 Sabre (sometimes called the Sabrejet) was a transonic jet fighter aircraft. The Sabre is best known for its Korean War role where it was pitted against the Soviet MiG-15. Although developed in the late 1940s and outdated by the end of the 1950s, the Sabre proved adaptable and continued as a front line fighter in air forces until the last active front line examples were retired by the Bolivian Air Force in 1994. Its success led to an extended production run of more than 7,800 aircraft between 1949 and 1956, in the United States, Japan and Italy. It was by far the most-produced Western jet fighter, with total production of all variants at 9,860 units. Variants were built in Canada and Australia. The Canadair Sabre added another 1,815 airframes, and the significantly redesigned CAC Sabre (sometimes known as the Avon Sabre or CAC CA-27), had a production run of 112.

    In exchange for letting the USAF use airbases in Spain, surplus F-86Fs were delivered to Spain's Ejercito Del Aire to replace their aging Hispano-built Messerschmitt Bf-109 fighters. Beginning in 1955, the Ejercito del Aire received a total of 270 ex-USAF F-86F-20, -25, and -30 fighters. They were reconditioned by the Construcciones Aeronauticas S.A (CASA) near Madrid, modernized, marked with Spanish insignia, and turned over to the Spanish Air Force. Most were brought up to F-86F-40-NA standards by CASA. The Spanish F-86Fs were given the designation C.5, and were assigned serial numbers C.5-1 to C.5-270. They served with the Ala de Caza 1 (Fighter Wing 1), AdC.2, AdC.4, AdC.5, and AdC.6. The last Sabre was delivered in 1958. These F-86Fs were replaced by the Northrop F-5 beginning in 1967. The last Spanish Sabre (C.5-199, F-86F-25 52-5330) was phased out of service at the end of 1974. A dozen or so Sabres are preserved in Spain. C.5-82 (former F-86F-40-NA serial number 55-3966) is on display at Torrejon. C.5-231 (former F-86F-25 serial number 52-5307) is mounted on exhibit at Moron.
     

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  3. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    #3 gekho, Apr 6, 2010
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2011
    This was the first jet plane destined to be a trainer of future jet fighter pilots. Known by pilots as the ‘T-Bird’ or just ‘T’, it was actually a two-seat development of the F-80 ‘Shooting Star’ (the first North American operative jet). The T33 would be one of the most famous trainers ever. Thousand of pilots received training in this aircraft and it served in tens of countries besides the USA, among them Spain. Sixty aircrafts of the type were deployed in our country in 1954. They were designed E15 and were the first jets to enter service with the Spanish Air force. The E15 served as trainer in the ‘Escuela de Reactores’ of Talavera Real (Badajoz) and later with the ’41 Grupo’ in Zaragoza. The aircraft was retired from active service in 1985. It was replaced by the Northrop F5B and the CASA C101 in Talavera and Zaragoza respectively.

    It was an easy to fly and maneuverable aircraft that made Spanish pilots familiar with a new way to operate, which was far more based on procedures than before. They also got used to the high speeds and less response of the jet engines. The type flew 79000 hours and almost all the jet pilots of that time trained in it. Only two T-33A were lost in accidents.
     

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  4. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    #4 gekho, Apr 6, 2010
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2011
    The North American T-6 Texan was known as "the pilot maker" because of its important role in preparing pilots for combat. Derived from the 1935 North American NA-16 prototype, a cantilever low-wing monoplane, the Texan filled the need for a basic combat trainer during WW II and beyond. The original order of 94 AT-6 Texans differed little from subsequent versions such as the AT-6A (1,847) which revised the fuel tanks or the AT-6D (4,388) and AT-6F (956) that strengthened as well as lightened the frame with the use of light alloys. In all, more than 17,000 airframes were designed to the Texan standards. North American's rapid production of the T-6 Texan coincided with the wartime expansion of the United States air war commitment. As of 1940, the required flights hours for combat pilots earning their wings had been cut to just 200 during a shortened training period of seven months. Of those hours, 75 were logged in the AT-6. U.S. Navy pilots flew the airplane extensively, under the SNJ designation, the most common of these being the SNJ-4, SNJ-5 and SNJ-6.

    British interest in the Texan design was piqued as early as 1938 when it ordered 200 under the designation Harvard Mk I or "Harvard As Is" for service in Southern Rhodesia training under the Commonwealth Air Training Program. As the Harvard Mk I (5,000+) design was modeled after the early BC-1 design, the subsequent Harvard Mk II utilized the improvements of the AT-6 models. During 1944, the AT-6D design was adopted by the RAF and named the Harvard MK III. This version was used to train pilots in instrument training in the inclement British weather and for senior officers to log required airtime. Much to the chagrin of the Air Force High Command, the Harvard "hack" was often used for non-military activities like joy-riding and unofficial jaunts across the English countryside.

    During 1946, the Canadian Car and Foundry company developed the Harvard Mk IV trainer to the specifications of the T-6G and produced 285 T-6Js under the same design for the USAF Mutual Aid Program. Designated the T-6G, the Texan saw major improvements in increased fuel capacity, an improved cockpit layout, as well as a steerable tailwheel. U.S. Air Force and U.S. Navy forces in the Korean War modified the Texan under the LT-6G designation and employed it in combat for forward air control of propeller and jet powered strike aircraft. Spain utilized the armed T-6 in combat during the Sahara conflict for patrol and counter-insurgency operations; the Spanish Air Force installed 7.7 mm Breda-SAFAT machine guns in the leading edges of each wing for use in gunnery training and ground attack. The aircraft was also modified to carry 200 kg bombs or unguided rockets under the wings. In 1986 they were retired.
     

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  5. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    The Grumman HU-16 Albatross is a large twin-radial engine amphibious flying boat. Originally designated SA-16, it was renamed HU-16 in 1962. An improvement of the design of the Grumman Mallard, the Albatross was developed to land in open ocean situations to rescue downed pilots. Its deep-V cross-section and substantial length enable it to land in the open sea. The Albatross was designed for optimal 4 ft seas, and could land in more severe conditions, but required JATO for takeoff in 8-10 ft seas or greater. Since the aircraft weighs over 12,500 pounds, pilots of US-registered Albatross aircraft must have a type rating. There is a yearly Albatross fly-in at Boulder City, Nevada where Albatross pilots can become type rated.

    The majority of Albatrosses were used by the U.S. Air Force, primarily by the Air Rescue Service, and initially designated as SA-16. The USAF utilized the SA-16 extensively in Korea for combat rescue, where it gained a reputation as a rugged and seaworthy craft. Later, the redesignated HU-16B (long-wing variant) Albatross was used by the U.S. Air Force's Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Service and saw extensive combat service during the Vietnam conflict. In addition a small number of Air National Guard Air Commando Groups were equipped with HU-16s for covert infiltration and extration of special forces from 1956 to 1971.

    The U.S. Navy also employed the HU-16D Albatross as a Search And Rescue aircraft from coastal naval air stations, both stateside and overseas. It was also employed as an operational support aircraft worldwide and for "skunk runs" from the former NAS Agana, Guam during the Vietnam War. Goodwill flights were also common to the surrounding Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands in the early 1970s. Open water landings and water takeoff training using JATO was also frequently conducted frequently by U.S. Navy HU-16s from locations such as NAS Agana, Guam; Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba; NAS Barbers Point, Hawaii; and NAS Pensacola, Florida, among other locations. The HU-16 was also operated by the U.S. Coast Guard as both a coastal and long-range open ocean SAR aircraft for many years until it was supplanted by the HU-25 Guardian and HC-130 Hercules.

    In Spain the Albatross arrived in 1954, being used for sea rescue, reconnaissance and antisubmarine warfare. They came to replace the Dornier Do-24, acquired during the WWII, that for many years had been serving in Mallorca as a sea rescue aircrafts. The Albatross were retired in 1978.
     

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  6. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    #6 gekho, Apr 7, 2010
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2011
    The CASA 2.111 was a medium bomber derived from the Heinkel He 111 and produced in Spain under license by Construcciones Aeronáuticas S.A.. The 2.111 models differed significantly from Heinkel's original design, featuring heavier armament and eventually Rolls Royce Merlin engines. The first Spanish built aircraft flew on 23 May 1945. Following the end of the war, access to the German-built Junkers engines became an issue, and CASA found an alternative with the Rolls-Royce Merlin 500. In 1953, 173 Merlin engines were ordered. The newly Merlin-powered bombers and reconnaissance bombers became the 2.111B and 2.111D, respectively; some were re-engined, while others were built new. A nine-passenger transport, the 2.111T8, was also developed and produced.[4] Spanish 2.111s served into the late 1960s and, in the case of the transports, early 1970s. Many of the aircraft retired in the 1960s found second lives in movies such as Battle of Britain and Patton, due to the family resemblance with Heinkel He 111s. The CASA 2.111 were used in combat in the close air support role against Moroccans during the Ifni War in 1957-1958.
     

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  7. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    #7 gekho, Apr 7, 2010
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2011
    The Douglas C-47 Skytrain or Dakota is a military transport aircraft that was developed from the Douglas DC-3 airliner. It was used extensively by the Allies during World War II and remained in front line operations through the 1950s with a few remaining in operation to this day.The C-47 differed from the civilian DC-3 in being fitted with a cargo door and strengthened floor. During World War II, the armed forces of many countries used the C-47 and modified DC-3s for the transport of troops, cargo and wounded. Over 10,000 aircraft were produced in Long Beach and Santa Monica, California and Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The Oklahoma City plant produced 5,354 C-47s from March 1943 until August 1945.

    Spain received its first DC-3 for Iberia in 1943, acquiring the Spanish Air Force two more in 1947. With the military agreement with the EEUU, many more aircrafts were acquired. 67 C-47 served with the 35, 37 and 46 Wings, being used as a transport aircraft, parachute platform and trainning plane. The last Dakota was retired in 1978.
     

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  8. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    The Boeing KC-97 Stratotanker was a United States strategic tanker aircraft based on the Boeing C-97 Stratofreighter. For many years, it was the backbone of the United States Air Force's tanker fleet until replaced by the Boeing KC-135. The KC-97 Stratotanker was an aerial refueling tanker variant of the C-97 Stratofreighter (which was itself based on the B-29 Superfortress), greatly modified with all the necessary tanks, plumbing, and "flying boom." The cavernous upper deck was capable of accommodating oversize cargo accessed through a very large left-side door, or transferrable jet fuel was contained in tanks on the lower deck. Both decks were heated and pressurized for high altitude operations.

    The Spanish Air Force operated 3 KC-97L's, being destinated to the Escuadrón 123, where they served to refuel the F-4 Phantoms of Ala 12. The Spanish AF also purchased two additional C-97G aircraft for use as a spares source at the air base at Albacete. These were sold off when the three main aircraft were withdrawn from service (which was in Sep-1976). One of those spares aircraft was 53-275 c/n 17057. This was sold to a scrap dealer and broken up at the Albacete air base. The other aircraft was 53-241 c/n 17023. It was transported from Albacete to Sotillo de la Adrada (about 75km west of Madrid) and converted to a cafetaria / discotheque; this aircraft was indeed completely destroyed by fire, on 02-Feb-1985. Of the three examples that served with the Spanish Air Force, one can be seen at the Cuatro Vientos Museum, and the other two are in private hands at Barcelona.
     

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  9. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    #9 gekho, Apr 8, 2010
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2011
    The Northrop F-5A/B Freedom Fighter and F-5E/F Tiger II are part of a family of widely used light supersonic fighter aircraft, designed and built by Northrop in the United States, beginning in 1960s. Hundreds remain in service in air forces around the world in the early 21st Century, and the type has also been the basis for a number of other aircraft. The F-5 started life as a privately funded light fighter program by Northrop in the 1950s. The first generation F-5A Freedom Fighter entered service in the 1960s. Over 800 were produced through 1972 for U.S. allies during the Cold War. The USAF had no need for a light fighter, but it did specify a requirement for a supersonic trainer and procured about 1,200 of a derivative airframe for this purpose, the T-38 Talon.

    The improved second-generation F-5E Tiger II was also primarily used by American Cold War allies and, in limited quantities, served in US military aviation as a training and aggressor aircraft; Tiger II production amounted to 1,400 of all versions, with production ending in 1987. Many F-5s continuing in service into the 1990s and 2000s have undergone a wide variety of upgrade programs to keep pace with the changing combat environment. The F-5 was also developed into a dedicated reconnaissance version, the RF-5 Tigereye. The F-5 serves as a starting point for a series of design studies which resulted in the twin-tailed Northrop YF-17 and the F/A-18 series of carrier-based fighters. The F-20 Tigershark was an advanced version of the F-5E that did not find a market. The F-5N/F variants remain in service with the United States Navy as an adversary trainer.

    CASA-built Spanish versions are known in Spain's Ejercito del Aire as the C.9 and CE.9, respectively, or as the SF-5 and SRF-5. The RF-5A reconnaissance version is equipped with four KS-92A cameras mounted in the nose. There are three diffrent versions:

    SF-5A : Single-seat fighter version of the F-5A.
    SRF-5A : Single-seat reconnaissance version of the RF-5A.
    SF-5B : Two-seat training version of the F-5B.

    All of them are used as advanced trainers.
     

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  10. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    #10 gekho, Apr 8, 2010
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2011
    The HA-200 Saeta (Dart) was the first Spanish turbojet aircraft. It was developed from the earlier piston powered trainer the HA-100 Triana with the participation of Willy Messerschmitt. The HA-200 was a low winged monoplane of all metal construction, with a tricycle undercarriage. It was powered by two Turboméca Marborés mounted side by-side in the forward fuselage and fed from an intake in the nose, exhausting from nozzles just aft of the wing trailing edge. The crew of two was accommodated in tandem in a pressurised cockpit, the first to be Spanish built and designed. The prototype first flew on 12 August 1955, and the first production aircraft flew in October 1962. The HA-200A aircraft were delivered to the Spanish Air Force with the designation E.14. A single seat version (the HA-220) for the ground-attack role was developed and delivered to the Spanish Air Force with the designation C.10, first flying on 25 April 1970, remaining in service until the end of 1981. The aircraft was built in Egypt under licence as the Helwan HA-200B Al-Kahira by the Helwan Air Works. The HA-220 was a ground attack version of the HA-200E for Spanish Air Force. 25 units were built.
     

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  11. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    The de Havilland Canada DHC-4 Caribou (known in the U.S. military as CV-2 and C-7 Caribou) is a Canadian-designed and produced specialized cargo aircraft with short takeoff and landing (STOL) capability. The Caribou was first flown in 1958 and although mainly retired from military operations, is still in use in small numbers as a rugged "bush" aircraft. The de Havilland Canada company's third STOL design was a big step up in size compared to its earlier DHC Beaver and DHC Otter, and was the first DHC design powered by two engines. The Caribou, however, was similar in concept in that it was designed as a rugged STOL utility. The Caribou was primarily a military tactical transport that in commercial service found itself a small niche in cargo hauling. The United States Army ordered 173 in 1959 and took delivery in 1961 under the designation AC-1, which was changed to CV-2 Caribou in 1962.

    The majority of Caribou production was destined for military operators, but the type's ruggedness and excellent STOL capabilities requiring runway lengths of only 1200 feet (365 metres)[1] also appealed to some commercial users. US certification was awarded on 23 December 1960. Ansett-MAL, which operated a single example in the New Guinea highlands, and AMOCO Ecuador were early customers, as was Air America, (a CIA front in South East Asia during the Vietnam War era for covert operations). Other civil Caribou aircraft entered commercial service after being retired from their military users.

    In 1968 12 DHC-4 were transfer to the Spanish Air Force, being assigned to the 372 Squadron of the 37 Wing, receiving the military code T-9. The Caribou was the first transport aircraft with STOL characteristic of the EdA, being very appreciated by the spanish pilots. A total of 30 Caribous served with the Spanish Air Force, beind retired in 1989.
     

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  12. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    #12 gekho, Apr 9, 2010
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2011
    The Lockheed F-104 Starfighter was an American single-engined, high-performance, supersonic interceptor aircraft that served with the United States Air Force (USAF) from 1958 until 1967. One of the Century Series of aircraft, it continued in service with Air National Guard units until it was phased out in 1975. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) flew a small mixed fleet of F-104 types in supersonic flight tests and spaceflight programs until they were retired in 1994. Several two-seat trainer versions were produced, the most numerous being the TF-104G. USAF F-104Cs saw service during the Vietnam War, and F-104A aircraft were deployed by Pakistan briefly during the Indo-Pakistani wars. Republic of China Air Force F-104s also engaged the People's Liberation Army Air Force over the disputed island of Kinmen. A set of modifications produced the F-104G model, which won a NATO competition for a new fighter-bomber.

    The ultimate production version of the F-104 was the F-104S all-weather interceptor designed by Aeritalia for the Italian Air Force, and equipped with radar-guided AIM-7 Sparrow missiles. An advanced F-104 with a high-mounted wing, known as the CL-1200 Lancer, did not proceed past the mock-up stage. A total of 2,578 Starfighters were eventually produced, mostly by NATO members. The F-104 served with the air forces of over a dozen nations The operational service of the Starfighter ended with its retirement by the Italian Air Force in May 2004, some 46 years after its introduction in 1958 by the USAF. The poor safety record of the Starfighter brought the aircraft into the public eye, especially in Luftwaffe service. The subsequent Lockheed bribery scandals surrounding the original purchase contracts caused considerable political controversy in Europe and Japan.

    The Spanish Air Force was not a major user of the F-104 Starfighter; 18 Canadair-built F-104Gs and three Lockheed-built TF-104Gs were delivered under the Military Assistance Program in 1965, being given the designation of "C.8" in Spanish service. These replaced the F-86F Sabres in Ala 6 the only Spanish unit to operate the type. They were replaced in 1972 by the much more capable F-4C Phantom, being the F-104 transferred to Greece and Turkey. It is notable that no aircraft were lost through accidents during 17,000 hours of operational use in Spain although it should also be noted that the aircraft was used in its intended role of an interceptor and mainly in very good flying weather.
     

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    gekho Active Member

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    #13 gekho, Apr 10, 2010
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2011
    The Mirage III is a supersonic fighter aircraft designed in France by Dassault Aviation during the late 1950s, and manufactured both in France and a number of other countries. It was a successful fighter aircraft, being sold to many air forces around the world and remaining in production for over a decade. Some of the world's smaller air forces still fly Mirage IIIs or variants as front-line equipment today.

    In 1953, the French Air Force issued a requirement for a relatively small and light all-weather fighter. It would have to be able to climb to an altitude of 18,000m in under 6 minutes. 25 June 1955 saw the first flight of the first proposal by Dassault, the MD-550 Mystere Delta. The MD-550 was powered by two Armstrong-Siddeley Vipers, with a thrust of 7.8 kN each, which, as Dassault recognised, were insufficient enough to provide the needed thrust. To enhance the climbing ability of the MD-550, a removable fairing with a SEPR-66 rocket was added under the fuselage. Testing the aircraft, now named Mirage I, proved it was to small to be operated adequately and the demanded Mach 2 was not in its reach. A bigger version was designed, named Mirage II, which was to be powered by two Turboméca Gabizo engines, with 10.7 kN thrust each. Design calculations proved this was also insufficient, even with added rocket booster support it would only reach Mach 1.5 instead of the required Mach 2. Because of this the Mirage II never reached production, remaining a “paper” aircraft only. But all of these developments eventually led to the Mirage III.

    During the 60s, the Spanish Air Force was equiped with F-86 Sabres and some F-104 Starfighters; it was necesary to acquired new aircrafts to modernized the fighter fleet and also to put and end to the United States weapons supply dependence, in order to finish with the use restriction problems. The chosen fighter was the Dassault Mirage III, basicly because it could be built by CASA and also because it proved to be areat fighter during the israeli-arab wars. During the 22 years that were active in Spain with the 11 Wing, every squadron had 12 single-seat Mirage IIIEE and three two-seater IIIDE, reciving the code C-11. They were replaced by the Mirage F-1 anf withdrawn for service in 1990.
     

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  14. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    Like many Sikorsky helicopters, the S-55 started out as a military helicopter for the US armed forces that was later adapted for commercial service. Sikorsky developed the S-55 in response to a US military requirement for a large general purpose helicopter. The US Defense Department awarded Sikorsky a contract to develop such a helicopter in 1948, and the first prototype flew for the first time on November 10 1949. The S-55 saw widespread US military service as H-19 in the Air Force, as H-19 Chickasaw in the Army, as HO4S in the Navy and Coast Guard, and as HRS in the Marine Corps. Civil certification for the commercial S-55 series was first awarded on March 25 1952.

    The initial civil variant was the S-55, powered by a 450kW (600hp) Pratt Whitney Wasp radial piston engine. Later civil variants include the S-55A which introduced a 520kW (700hp) Wright R-1300 radial piston engine, while the S-55C had a P&W R-1340 engine and the repositioned tail boom of the S-55A. Westland in the UK licence built 400 S-55s as the WS-55 Whirlwind for mainly military but also commercial use. Early Whirlwinds were similar to the S-55 save for their Alvis Leonides radial engine, later developments were powered by a 785kW (1050shp) Rolls-Royce Bristol Gnome H.1000 turboshaft. S-55 licence manufacture was also undertaken in Japan by Mitsubishi and in France by Sud-Est.

    The Spanish Air force acquired eleven units, being destinated to the 57 Squadron, where they were used for sea-rescue duties. Later seventeen more units were purchsed in the EEUU, being shared between the Getafe´s Liaison Squadron and Tablada´s 402 Squadron. In 1965 all the surviving units were sent to the 803 Squadron in Getafe for rescue misions. In 1970 they were retired from service. One example is preserved at the Cuatro vientos Museum.
     

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    wheelsup_cavu Well-Known Member

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    Great pictures and writeups Gekho. :thumbup:


    Wheels
     
  16. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    #16 gekho, Apr 13, 2010
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2010
    Bell designed its Model 204 in response to a 1955 United States Army requirement for a utility helicopter. The 204 was a giant step forward in helicopter design, being one of the first to be powered by a turboshaft. The turboshaft engine radically improved the practicality of the helicopter due to its light weight and high power to weight ratio, lower fuel consumption, and lower maintenance and operating costs. The use of a turboshaft in the 204 allowed it to carry a useful payload over respectable ranges and at reasonable speeds, which resulted in the 204 and subsequent 205 becoming the most successful western helicopter series in terms of numbers built. The civil 204B was first delivered in 1961. The subsequent Model 205A-1 is equivalent to the UH-1H, which, compared to the 204, is longer, larger, and has better performance and a more powerful engine. Over 60 civil Model 204Bs had been delivered by 1967, while further examples were built by Agusta-Bell up until 1973. 12,000 Model 205s (including civil 205A-1s) were built by Bell and Agusta-Bell up to the early 1980s. Numerous ex military 204s and 205s converted for commercial use.

    This helicopter, built by the C.A.G. Agusta Spa company under licence in italy, was acquired by the Spanish Air Force for the 801,802 and 803 Squadrons to be used as Search and Rescue duties. The first 14 units arrived in 1966, with three more examples in 1974 for the Trainning Helicopter School of Cuatro Vientos. The following year three more units were bought for Save and Rescue misions and one more for VIPS transport. When the Helicopter School was moved to Armilla, Granada, all the AB-205 were transfered to the 873 Squadron, 78 Wing, based in the mentioned town. After 27 years of service and 51.000 hours of flying, the UH-1 were retired in 1990 and replaced by the Eurocopter Colibri in trainning duties.
     

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  17. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    The Bell 47 is a two-bladed, single engine, light helicopter manufactured by Bell Helicopter. Based on the third Model 30 prototype, Bell's first helicopter designed by Arthur M. Young, the Bell 47 became the first helicopter certified for civilian use on 8 March 1946. More than 5,600 Bell 47 aircraft were produced, including aircraft produced under license by Agusta in Italy, Kawasaki Heavy Industries in Japan, and Westland Aircraft in the United Kingdom. The Bell 47J Ranger is modified version with a fully enclosed cabin and fuselage.

    Early models were variable in appearance, with open cockpits or sheet metal cabins, fabric covered or open structures, some with four-wheel landing gear. Later model D and Korean War H-13D and E types settled to a more utilitarian style. The most common model, the 47G introduced in 1953, can be recognized by the full bubble canopy, exposed welded-tube tail boom, saddle fuel tanks, and skid landing gear. The later three-seat 47H had an enclosed cabin with full cowling and monocoque tail boom. It was an effort to market a "luxury" version of the basic 47G. Relatively few were produced. Engines were Franklin or Lycoming horizontally-opposed piston engines of 200 to 305 HP (150 to 230 kW). Seating varied from two (early 47s and the later G-5A) to four (the J and KH-4). As of 2005, many are still in use as trainers and in agriculture.

    Bell 47s were produced in Japan by a Bell and Kawasaki venture; this led to the Kawasaki KH-4 variant, a four seat version of the Model 47 with a cabin similar to the Bell 47J. It differed from the "J" in having a standard uncovered tailboom and fuel tanks like the G series. They were sold throughout Asia, and some were used in Australia.
     

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  18. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    #18 gekho, Apr 15, 2010
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2011
    The McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II is a tandem two-seat, twin-engined, all-weather, long-range supersonic jet interceptor fighter/fighter-bomber originally developed for the U.S. Navy by McDonnell Aircraft. Proving highly adaptable, it became a major part of the air wings of the United States Navy, Marine Corps, and Air Force. It was used extensively by all three of these services during the Vietnam War, serving as the principal air superiority fighter for both the Navy and Air Force, as well as being important in the ground-attack and reconnaissance roles by the close of U.S. involvement in the war.

    First entering service in 1960, the Phantom continued to form a major part of U.S. military air power throughout the 1970s and 1980s, being gradually replaced by more modern aircraft such as the F-15 Eagle and F-16 Fighting Falcon in the U.S. Air Force; the F-14 Tomcat and F/A-18 Hornet in the U.S. Navy; and the F/A-18 in the U.S. Marine Corps. It remained in use by the U.S. in the reconnaissance and Wild Weasel roles in the 1991 Gulf War, finally leaving service in 1996. The Phantom was also operated by the armed forces of 11 other nations. Israeli Phantoms saw extensive combat in several Arab–Israeli conflicts, while Iran used its large fleet of Phantoms in the Iran–Iraq War. Phantoms remain in front line service with seven countries, and in use as an unmanned target in the U.S. Air Force. Phantom production ran from 1958 to 1979, with a total of 5,195 built.

    The Spanish Air Force acquired its first batch of ex-USAF F-4C Phantoms in 1971 under the "Peace Alfa" program. Designated C.12, the aircraft were retired in 1989. At the same time, the SAF received a number of ex-USAF RF-4Cs, designated CR.12. In 1995–1996, these aircraft received extensive avionics upgrades. Spain retired its RF-4s in 2002.
     

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  19. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    #19 gekho, Apr 15, 2010
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2011
    More pics
     

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  20. gekho

    gekho Active Member

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    #20 gekho, Apr 15, 2010
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2011
    This is the reconnaissance version of the F-4
     

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