Grumman Duck Beaching and Flight

Ad: This forum contains affiliate links to products on Amazon and eBay. More information in Terms and rules

To start with Grumman only built 645, few made it to the post war market. There are so few still around because of their limited use, post war buyers quickly found out that it had limited usage. Room for only 4 max (and you better be VERY CLOSE friends downstairs). It was comparatively slow, noisy and that Wright R-1820 used a lot of fuel for what you got.
There were much better options in used amphibians at the time like the Goose or Widgeon. Still, there are about 5 or 6 I think that are capable of flying with only 2/3 that I can think of being flown regularly, more or less. I think there a couple more being restored. It's more of a cult airplane than anything practical. It is one heck of an Air Show thief though, it steals the show every time it shows up. It's the only Grumman Amphibian type I haven't snagged a ride in ........ yet. (If someone with one is passing through Twin Falls ID, please let me know ) ;)
 
Despite the description of cramped quarters, noisy engine, etc., you still get lots of bang for your bucks. The Goose uses two R-985s which, in my opinion uses more gas than the single R-1820 & for a warbird to seat more than one ( pilot) is a pretty good deal.

I was fortunate to see one up close & personal while it was still based at the (late) Paul Mantz' Hollywood Movieland Air Museum based out of Orange County (now renamed John Wayne) Airport. I must've taken 100 detailed b+w detailed photos of this plane for my future modeling project.

This is the same aircraft that was purchased by Kermit Weeks.

No interior shots though. I couldn't climb up & sneak in without attracting undo attention from an elderly lady manning the box office. After a few of my previous visits in which I was taking detailed photos of other aircraft, she started keeping a weary eye on me.

It was more than once, that she chased me off other planes trying to take interior photos. So you can imagine with the Duck sitting high up on its landing gear, it was next-to-impossible to gain entrance & not get caught….. Fun times!.
 
Despite the description of cramped quarters, noisy engine, etc., you still get lots of bang for your bucks. The Goose uses two R-985s which, in my opinion uses more gas than the single R-1820 & for a warbird to seat more than one ( pilot) is a pretty good deal.

I was fortunate to see one up close & personal while it was still based at the (late) Paul Mantz' Hollywood Movieland Air Museum based out of Orange County (now renamed John Wayne) Airport. I must've taken 100 detailed b+w detailed photos of this plane for my future modeling project.

This is the same aircraft that was purchased by Kermit Weeks.

No interior shots though. I couldn't climb up & sneak in without attracting undo attention from an elderly lady manning the box office. After a few of my previous visits in which I was taking detailed photos of other aircraft, she started keeping a weary eye on me.

It was more than once, that she chased me off other planes trying to take interior photos. So you can imagine with the Duck sitting high up on its landing gear, it was next-to-impossible to gain entrance & not get caught….. Fun times!.
I don't think you'd have seen much. It was a working movie airplane, so lightened up. Basic Mil. cockpit and very little in the back seat if anything more than a seat (if that). Downstairs .... I'd been surprised if there was anything. I have interior photos of most of the J2F variants if you're interested. Not much changed between them.
 
Yes, please. I would be very much interested in cockpit & interior photos of the Grumman Duck.

On a whim, I purchased the complex retracting landing gear from Banana Hobby. This retraction gear set is really more designed to accommodate to the curved fuselage of the Grumman F4F series Wildcat such that the wheels are canted inwards when fully retracted.

Obviously this is in contrast to the near- vertical position when retracted flush into the fuselage/float combination. Buy at least it's a start & my efforts to model a J2F series Duck in r/c size.

I already have the plans that I purchased several years ago. It's now just a matter of sizing the plans to fit the retraction gears.

Thanking you in advance for your generous offer.

Gary
 
Last edited:
The old Glenco Grumman Duck kit shows the distinctive features of the odd bird.
 

Attachments

  • 101_3949 a.jpg
    101_3949 a.jpg
    206 KB · Views: 13
Here's the first of 38 images.
 

Attachments

  • duck12.jpg
    duck12.jpg
    54 KB · Views: 10
  • duck13.jpg
    duck13.jpg
    54.1 KB · Views: 10
  • duck14.jpg
    duck14.jpg
    50.5 KB · Views: 12
  • duck15.jpg
    duck15.jpg
    59.4 KB · Views: 12
  • duck16.jpg
    duck16.jpg
    47.4 KB · Views: 12
  • duck17.jpg
    duck17.jpg
    52.5 KB · Views: 11
  • duck18.jpg
    duck18.jpg
    63.3 KB · Views: 10
  • duck19.jpg
    duck19.jpg
    67.1 KB · Views: 10
  • duck20.jpg
    duck20.jpg
    64.7 KB · Views: 10
  • duck11.jpg
    duck11.jpg
    55.8 KB · Views: 9
  • duck10.jpg
    duck10.jpg
    65.3 KB · Views: 9
  • duck01.jpg
    duck01.jpg
    87.5 KB · Views: 10
  • duck02.jpg
    duck02.jpg
    86.5 KB · Views: 10
  • duck03.jpg
    duck03.jpg
    69.4 KB · Views: 10
  • duck04.jpg
    duck04.jpg
    71.5 KB · Views: 10
  • duck05.jpg
    duck05.jpg
    62.8 KB · Views: 10
  • duck06.jpg
    duck06.jpg
    74.8 KB · Views: 10
  • duck07.jpg
    duck07.jpg
    53.2 KB · Views: 9
  • duck08.jpg
    duck08.jpg
    67.9 KB · Views: 9
  • duck09.jpg
    duck09.jpg
    55.4 KB · Views: 10
Here are the rest.
 

Attachments

  • duck31.jpg
    duck31.jpg
    53.3 KB · Views: 13
  • duck32.jpg
    duck32.jpg
    72.8 KB · Views: 12
  • duck33.jpg
    duck33.jpg
    57.8 KB · Views: 12
  • duck34.jpg
    duck34.jpg
    54.3 KB · Views: 12
  • duck35.jpg
    duck35.jpg
    48.9 KB · Views: 12
  • duck36.jpg
    duck36.jpg
    68.2 KB · Views: 13
  • duck37.jpg
    duck37.jpg
    97.9 KB · Views: 14
  • duck38.jpg
    duck38.jpg
    84.4 KB · Views: 14
  • duck30.jpg
    duck30.jpg
    56.3 KB · Views: 13
  • duck29.jpg
    duck29.jpg
    56.9 KB · Views: 11
  • duck21.jpg
    duck21.jpg
    58 KB · Views: 13
  • duck22.jpg
    duck22.jpg
    47.7 KB · Views: 13
  • duck23.jpg
    duck23.jpg
    43 KB · Views: 14
  • duck24.jpg
    duck24.jpg
    54.9 KB · Views: 14
  • duck25.jpg
    duck25.jpg
    57.9 KB · Views: 13
  • duck26.jpg
    duck26.jpg
    66.6 KB · Views: 13
  • duck27.jpg
    duck27.jpg
    54.9 KB · Views: 12
  • duck28.jpg
    duck28.jpg
    50.2 KB · Views: 11
Despite the description of cramped quarters, noisy engine, etc., you still get lots of bang for your bucks. The Goose uses two R-985s which, in my opinion uses more gas than the single R-1820 & for a warbird to seat more than one ( pilot) is a pretty good deal.

I was fortunate to see one up close & personal while it was still based at the (late) Paul Mantz' Hollywood Movieland Air Museum based out of Orange County (now renamed John Wayne) Airport. I must've taken 100 detailed b+w detailed photos of this plane for my future modeling project.

Back in the mid 1970s Frank Tallman was doing a nice aerobatic diplay with this Duck. Quite leisurely, but great fun to watch. This was at the 1976 Reno Air Race.
 

Attachments

  • R76 Tallman Duck withROC110 copy.jpg
    R76 Tallman Duck withROC110 copy.jpg
    305.1 KB · Views: 14

Users who are viewing this thread

Back