Is this a good deal

Discussion in 'Painting Questions, Tutorials and Guidebooks' started by TimEwers, Nov 23, 2010.

  1. TimEwers

    TimEwers Member

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  2. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    At a very approximate conversion, this seems to work out at around £110, in UK prices.
    The Aztek 'brushes are pretty good, depending on model. The compressor is the 'Testors' version of a type marketed under various brand names, and is the same as the one I use. It is very basic, with no pressure regulation, but works very well indeed - UK price is around £35 to £40.
    However, before rushing into things, I would look around to see if there are better deals at the same price, or perhaps slightly more. Certainly here in the UK there are deals including an all-metal dual-action airbrush, with braided hose, connectors etc, and a good compressor, with regulation, for around the same price.
     
  3. Sweb

    Sweb Member

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  4. mikewint

    mikewint Well-Known Member

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    #4 mikewint, Nov 23, 2010
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2010
    TimEwers, This is the air brush that i have, though i have a bigger compressor with a filter, pressure gauge, and regulator. I have a different type cleaning station and several more types and kinds of feed cups. the big gallon compressor is larger than you need for an air brush and the single action brushes are more difficult to use. the Aztec brush you are looking at is a dual action internal mix which means that you adjust that little back thumb wheel to control paint flow, any thing from a small mist to full blast. the paint and air mix internally and come out the nozzle. the large black lever controls the air flow only when the thumb wheel is used. With the thumb wheel full on the large lever controls both paint and air flow. the single action brushes avove are external mix. they work by venturi action, the air blows across a small opening in the paint bottle creating a vacuum which sucks out the paint. the control lever controls both air and paint. these are good if you are painting several colors in succession. paint is left in the bottles and just snapped in place as you need new colors.
    you will also need a collection of various style nozzles which flow different amounts of paint and different types of paint from fine to broad to splatter.
    in my opinion it is an excellent set that you will grow into from beginner to advanced.
    start out spraying water onto cardboard, then add some food color. get a feel for the brush, nozzles, and pressures. then go to acrylics (nice water or rubbing alcohol clean up) then the enamels and lacquers if you want
     
  5. bob3170

    bob3170 Member

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    You might want to check out this site:

    Airbrush-Depot.com huge discounts on 1000?s of complete airbrush kits from all major brands

    The Aztec airbrush is OK, some people like them, some don't, I think it's more a matter of what you are used to using more than anything else. I prefer the "standard" type airbrush myself, having my first Badger 200, oh, some 30 odd years ago, but I have painted many a model with the Aztec, everything from lacquer on Lexan RC car bodies to acrylics on WWII aircraft (and Alclad).

    I'd be a little leary of the compressor though, I'm not sure if it will have the volume if you decided to upgrade. If you can handle it, go for a compressor with a tank and a regulator, the tank helps to even out the airflow, although the tankless ones do seem to work just fine. Just remember, you can have a compressor that is too small, but never one that is too large, just make sure it is regulated.
     
  6. mikewint

    mikewint Well-Known Member

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    mine is a model 107CAB18-326, it is tankless, very compact, and has a very smooth airflow. everything i have was purchased on ebay, paid $45 for the compressor. Bought the Aztec on a close-out for about the same, came with a nice wooden storage box with three cups and three nozzels. The dual action is great though the internal mix makes for more clean up than the single external
     
  7. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    I'd agree about a slightly better compressor, but the one shown is more than adequate for the average modelling use. The trick is not what the compressor can, or can't, do, but what the finger does on the 'brush.
    I've been using a similar compressor for almost two years now, without problems, and, although a little more versatility would be welcome, this thing cost a pittance, and still works as well as one which would have cost four or five times as much, with not a lot of advantage to show.
    The art is in using what airflow is available, and using it correctly - which comes with practice. Believe me, I've used kit costing x thousand £/$, and had the same result with kit costing peanuts. OK, if it's going to be a long-term, semi-pro or professional investment, get the best you can afford, but remember that most compressors (of this type) were designed for the graphics market, used 12 hours per day, 6 days per week, and are priced accordingly. Add to that the 'Wedding Syndrome', where a niche market trebles retail prices, and that's what you'll find with all tools in modelling!
     
  8. mikewint

    mikewint Well-Known Member

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    This is my Aztec double action internal mix. the silver thumb screw adjust pait flow and keeps it constant no matter what you do with the big black lever. Various spray nozzels in the top row, 2 sizes of glass paint jars siphon style, and 4 sizes of gravity feed cups.
    Second is my compressor, to the right the air filter, yellow knob is the pressure regulator, pressure gauge, and below that a water trap and fine ceramic filter. $90 for everything
     

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