Jimmy Doolittle and the Doolittle Board

Discussion in 'Post-War' started by gjs238, Sep 30, 2014.

  1. gjs238

    gjs238 Well-Known Member

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    Can anyone shed light on the "Doolittle Board?"
    All I know is what was on the Jimmy Doolittle Wikipedia page, pasted below.

    What changes were made?
    Can anyone opine?

    Thanks


    On 27 March 1946 Doolittle was requested by the Secretary of War Robert P. Patterson to head a commission on the relationships between officers and enlisted men in the US Army. Called the "Doolittle Board" or informally the "GI Gripes Board" many of the recommendations were taken on board for the post war volunteer US Army,.[8] though many professional officers and non commissioned officers thought the Board "destroyed the discipline of the army".[9] After the Korean War columnist Hanson Baldwin said the Doolittle Board "caused severe damage to service effectiveness by recommendations intended to 'democratize' the Army - a concept that is self-contradictory".[10]
     
  2. vikingBerserker

    vikingBerserker Well-Known Member

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    From Page 292 of Calculated Risk by his daughter Jonna Doolittle Hoppes:

    "In May the unanimous report was presented to Secretary Patterson. A number of items to improve the leadership of the officer corps was recommended, including rigorous screening out of incompetents and an internal policing system to prevent abuse of privileges. The board also recommended adequate pay and allowance scales, equal accumulation of leave or furlough time, and equity of treatment of both enlisted and commissioned personnel in the administration of military justice."

    Those really do not sound like bad ideas to me, especially the last one.
     
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