P-47N ground attack

Discussion in 'Weapons Systems Tech.' started by Micdrow, Oct 21, 2007.

  1. Micdrow

    Micdrow “Archive”
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    I new that the P-47N was used as a ground attack fighter but to me this has new meaning. Lot of fire power sitting here. Pictures from the P-47 thunderbolt squadron signal in Detail series.
     

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  2. SteveH

    SteveH Member

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    I'm assuming these are post war? Not familiar with the tail marking, and the clipped wings suggest ita an N model. Perhaps some late Pacific island -beating?

    Steve
     
  3. Micdrow

    Micdrow “Archive”
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    I have no clue Steve other then they are of a N model. There was no other information in the topic next to info other then loaded out for ground attack instead of long range essort.
     
  4. comiso90

    comiso90 Active Member

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    Was that a load that a rookie or average pilot could manage?

    In the PTO, Lindberg demonstrated load and distance maximizing techniques by altering the air/fuel mixture and constant maintenance of the performance envelope.

    .
     
  5. Jank

    Jank Member

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    That's 2,500lbs of bombs and 1,400lbs of rockets (I understand that each rocket weighs 140lbs) for a grand total of 3,900lbs.

    The P-47N performance and spec book for the P-47N put out by Republic states that it is designed to handle a 1,600lb bomb load under each wing and a 500 pounder under the fuselage.
     
  6. Jank

    Jank Member

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    Yes, average pilots did it but not always successfully. The P-47N full of fuel and ordinance was a very heavy ship. Below is a fascinating read about Bolt drivers out of LeShima:

    ~318thFighterGroup.IeShima.html

    The engine power loss problems had been resolved internally by the 318th and the runways lengthened by this time, but the earlier inquiry to Republic Aviation had brought a response. Republic Aviation's legendary Chief Test Pilot, Joe "Baldy" Parker, had more hours in all the models of P-47s than anyone, and he had come to "show the boys how it's done". He proposed to take off with two 300 gallon external fuel tanks AND a full combat load. Phil Rasmussen protested, "There is no point in you flying this load because we are not going to fly it. We have enough experience to attest that it can't be done routinely and any gimmicks you show us are just going to be marginal stuff that won't guarantee protection for our pilots, so why bother?"


    It went up to General Thayer Olds, the 301st Wing CO. "This is nuts. It's just a stunt".

    "Give him what he wants" said the General.

    Accounts of this incident refer to Parker as patronizing and that probably isn't fair to the man. Test pilots are a very confident bunch in an occupation that tends to kill them fast if they are not. But Parker didn't pay much heed to anyone on Ie Shima either. He had the 300 gallon drop tanks filled with water to add even more weight, and didn't even pause for a pre roll check. He never got the required 165 MPH take off speed. Republic's top test pilot crashed and burned in a 19th Squadron T-Bolt off the end of a runway a few days after Hiroshima, showing the boys how it was done.

    There is probably a moral in this story somewhere.
     
  7. Micdrow

    Micdrow “Archive”
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    Interesting info ther Jank, many thanks
     
  8. luiz camacho

    luiz camacho New Member

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    MICDROW ,

    DO YOU HAVE PHOTOS , DRAWNINGS OF FIGHETRS, BOMBERS, FIGHTER- BOMBERS USING THEIR WEAPONS ?

    THE PHOTO OF P-47 N IS GREAT !
     
  9. Colin1

    Colin1 Active Member

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    My first thoughts
    when I saw an N loaded up like that was 'how long would the runway need to be'
    I guess the story for test pilot Joe Parker would be 'longer than that'

    So loaded like that and for a maximum range op, what would the N weigh in at? It must have handled like a small bomber.
     
  10. rochie

    rochie Well-Known Member

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    i've read that the runway at Ie Shima was shorter than needed but the P-47's had to get over raised bit of ground at the runway's end then they went over a cliff the other side!!!!
    but many still left a wake in the water before flying on with the mission
     
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