Performing a snap roll

Discussion in 'IL-2 Sturmovik Pilot's Lounge' started by shiro_amada_jp, Feb 9, 2009.

  1. shiro_amada_jp

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2009
    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    How do you perform a snap roll correctly? Is this an evasive maneuver done alone or in combination with other defensive maneuvers to be more effective?
     
  2. Amsel

    Amsel Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2008
    Messages:
    1,857
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Texas
    I use the rudder and aeileron. For example, left rudder and then a quick roll with the aeileron to the left.
     
  3. eddie_brunette

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2007
    Messages:
    573
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Occupation:
    Graphic Designer, Musician
    Location:
    Nelspruit, Mpumalanga
    what plane you using?
     
  4. shiro_amada_jp

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2009
    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    I usually fly the A6M5 Zero. When I do snap rolls in the Zero, I apply some pitch input: sudden tug on the stick. The resulting roll is violent and sometimes ends up in a stall. Sometimes it succeeds, but I need to give it some right rudder to stabilize the plane.
     
  5. eddie_brunette

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2007
    Messages:
    573
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Occupation:
    Graphic Designer, Musician
    Location:
    Nelspruit, Mpumalanga
    Well, reading the above, you are doing it right.
    I personally think luck plays a big part with the snap roll.

    I'm no fan of the '51, but it is a very easy plane to "snap" during dogfights and recovers quite easily, but then the '39 also easy to "snap", but way more difficult to recover.

    Personally to me the A6M is a fantastic plane for aerobatics and for ACM, just don’t get shot at, while flying it

    But when you have E/A on your 6, it is very satisfying when you do a successful “snap” and end up shooting his @ss down!

    edd
     
  6. drgondog

    drgondog Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2006
    Messages:
    7,084
    Likes Received:
    313
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Occupation:
    Executive, Consulting
    Location:
    Scurry, Texas
    That is the way it is done in real life (intentionally).

    In a Mustang at low speed one may also achieve this when in 20 degrees of flap setting, low speed, by stupidly running the throttle up to max power.

    On final approach, the latter technique is non repeatable.
     
  7. timshatz

    timshatz Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2006
    Messages:
    4,441
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    MGR
    Location:
    Phila, Pa
    And friends of yours with questionable morals will be consoling your widow. :)
     
  8. drgondog

    drgondog Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2006
    Messages:
    7,084
    Likes Received:
    313
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Occupation:
    Executive, Consulting
    Location:
    Scurry, Texas
    Or impeccable morals - either way I won't be there! So true, Tim.

    This is one of the problems between understanding the manual and having someone with tribal knowledge steering you through the 'shoals'..
     
  9. shiro_amada_jp

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2009
    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Yeah, the Zero is a superb fighter when it comes to a turning battle and I like it because it's also a plane where you can learn the "best practices" when it comes to dogfighting. Because the Zero lacks armor and can easily be shot down, you need to be constantly changing directions all the time. You can't fly straight for more than a few seconds. Also, you need to be on guard always, checking your six for an enemy fighter moving in for a well placed shot at you. When engaging another aircraft, you can't be fixated on your target in case an enemy aircraft sneaks up on you.
     
  10. GrauGeist

    GrauGeist Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2008
    Messages:
    13,636
    Likes Received:
    1,558
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Public Safety Automotive Technician
    Location:
    Redding, California
    Home Page:
    A few things to consider, when trying this in battle...

    First would be having a good idea of the distance between you and the enemy behind you. Pulling a snap-roll can end up with your adversary flying up your "tail-pipe", especially if their reflexes assume you're about to follow through with your sudden nose-up attitude (a breaking loop, etc).

    The other, is what's your speed at the time? Realistically, you can momentarily generate some extreme G's and you're wings may not like that. The higher the speed, the more force created at the wing root. You could end up in the silk staring down at the falling parts that used to be called an airplane before you tried your stunt.

    And one last thing to think about...how well does your aircraft recover from a stall or spin? If the snap-roll isn't performed properly, you run the risk of a brutal stall. Stalling in combat, at low altitudes or in aircraft like a P-39 is not fun. :lol:
     
  11. eddie_brunette

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2007
    Messages:
    573
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Occupation:
    Graphic Designer, Musician
    Location:
    Nelspruit, Mpumalanga
    You are very right, but what you have written MUST be applied to all
    A/C :p :p :p

    edd
     
  12. timshatz

    timshatz Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2006
    Messages:
    4,441
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    MGR
    Location:
    Phila, Pa
    Ain't that the truth! Flight sims only go so far, gotta get stick time with an instructor to really learn how to fly. I miss that "seat of the pants" feel in a sim.
     
  13. shiro_amada_jp

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2009
    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Good point. I haven't considered the G-loading at all...

    The first time I attempted a snap roll, I was flying below 1000m. The plane stalled and I wasn't able to recover in time. So now I fly above 2000m whenever I do this maneuver.
     
Loading...
Similar Threads
  1. Francis marliere
    Replies:
    46
    Views:
    11,593
  2. trackend
    Replies:
    102
    Views:
    4,493
  3. HoHun
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    959
  4. trackend
    Replies:
    105
    Views:
    5,192
  5. v2
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    1,602

Share This Page