Scribing

Discussion in 'Questions on Kits, Decals, Tools and Pilots' started by Heinz, May 29, 2008.

  1. Heinz

    Heinz Active Member

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    What do people use and how do you go about it?

    At the moment my attention is brought to the scerario when you have filled a fuselague gap but lost some panel line definition.

    Also for models with raised panels, I've read where modellers sand them off and rescribe it all. Searched for a few articles about it but haven't found anything really concrete.

    Cheers.
     
  2. Wurger

    Wurger Siggy Master
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    Alex, do you ask about these raised panel lines or these recessed ones?
     
  3. Heinz

    Heinz Active Member

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    Im talking about recessed lines Wojtek.

    Basically I'd like to know how to do it to my models.
     
  4. Wurger

    Wurger Siggy Master
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    It's ok.Making of these is quite easy but usually needs some training ( on an old scrap model for instance). For recessed lines you will need a thin matal ruler,some needles of different diameters,also useful razor blade, a thin knife, sandpaper of different grades and a brush with quite inflexible piles.

    The first step is to remove all raised lines with sanding.Then using a pencil and a ruler draw these lines in proper places.Note. I think that if these raised lines are in proper places these can be used as "tracks" for scribing.

    Step two : using these penciled lines and the metal ruler ( on bended surfaces you can use thin metal strips as the ruler.What is more their shape of edges can make easier fixing to the surface) and a needle you can scratch these lines.Usually two runs of the needle are enough to make these grooves engraved.Then use a brush to remove some plastic chips that always appear during this process.

    Step three : When all panel lines are engraved , use tiny sandpaper ( 1000-2000 grade) to make the panel line edges smooth.Then once again use the brush to remove all plastic dust that gathered in recessed lines.

    It is a short description but I think it should be enough for the engraving.
     
  5. A4K

    A4K Well-Known Member

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    Great info Wojtek! Thanks mate!

    I started scribing my models too not long ago, and use a cut down metal venetian blind and a normal metal workers scriber. I like Wojtek's idea of using a pin, as the panel line would be a bit thinner (and more 'in-scale' ) than those done with the scriber tip.
    The good thing with the metal venetian blind is it's very thin aluminium, so it's light and flexible, and looking end-on, is curved in the middle for strength, which means there is less chance of slicing your fingers if the blade slips and starts riding the metal.
     
  6. Wurger

    Wurger Siggy Master
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  7. Heinz

    Heinz Active Member

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    Thanks Wojtek :)

    You are indeed a enclyclopedia of modelling :D

    Good thinking Evan on the venetian blind strip!
    To bad we got rid of ours recently :lol:
     
  8. Wurger

    Wurger Siggy Master
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    You are welcome Alex.:D

    :oops: :oops: :oops: :oops:


    Could you explain to me what is the metal venetian blind, please ? I don't know this name of the tool. :oops:
     
  9. Heinz

    Heinz Active Member

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    [​IMG]

    The blinds for your windows, one of the strips is what we are refering to. They are very, very flexible and strong.

    I hope that makes sense mate :)
     
  10. Wurger

    Wurger Siggy Master
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    Now I thank you.:D Yep it is a good material for this purpose.Usually I use some photoetched patterns for engravering all hatches or inspection panels.For long lines I use a metal flexible ruler which I bought from Russians on a flea market.For non standard panels,lines I make my own patterns using aluminium plates of cans of beer,CocaCola etc...
     
  11. A4K

    A4K Well-Known Member

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    Great idea Wojtek, and great info too!
    I do sometimes use a craftknife too (forgot to mention) hence the finger-slicing comment (boy, do I know about that one...)

    Alex, do you want a couple of "specialised scribing rulers" ? I grabbed a few strips from my fiancée's mum when she threw her blinds out..
     
  12. Wurger

    Wurger Siggy Master
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    As I remember there are offered some tools for engravering.I don't remember of what firm these are (maybe Tamiya?????)If I find something I'll post the info.
    In meantime there is a very useful tool made in Czech a saw-razor-blade.
     

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  13. Jgonzalez

    Jgonzalez Member

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    Interesting post. I use scribers used by jewelers. They are quite handy and come in a variety of gauges, some are really thin and sharp.
     
  14. Heinz

    Heinz Active Member

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    Good thinking jgonzalez! I imagine the fine work involved for jewellery is not much different for models.

    Thanks for the offer Evan but I should be able to get my hands on some. :D

    Keep them as spares you never know. Thanks anyway:)
     
  15. tango35

    tango35 Member

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    Hello folks,
    i use scribers used by dentists and dymotape for basic scribing and for complex scribing i have scribing templates from Lion Roar.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The dentist stuff cost me around 10 euro, because i bought it on a fleamarket. Heard from a modeler from my club a ceaper way; he asked his dentist for out of use stuff.


    greets
    Thomas
     
  16. Wurger

    Wurger Siggy Master
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    Good stuff Tango 35.These tools are very useful.I use similar templates and dentists' ones.They make engravering much easier.:D
     
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