Short Stirling

Discussion in 'Other Mechanical Systems Tech.' started by krieghund, Jan 23, 2010.

  1. krieghund

    krieghund Member

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    Anyone have the Pilot's Notes for the Stirling?
     
  2. Bronco

    Bronco Member

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    I too would love to see a Stirling manual!
     
  3. wells

    wells Member

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    yep, anything in particular? I haven't scanned it...
     
  4. brewerjerry

    brewerjerry Active Member

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    Hi
    If you can upload the full pilots notes that would be awesome.:D
    but anything would do as there is nothing on this website so far.:)
    cheers
    Jerry
     
  5. wells

    wells Member

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    hmm, can't delete my own message, hehe

    pilot's notes posted below
     
  6. wells

    wells Member

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    #6 wells, Oct 29, 2010
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2010
    Engine failure during take-off

    Failure of one engine - At loads up to 58000 lbs, the aircraft will climb at 145 MPH and climbing boost. Do not climb at less than 145 MPH. Leave the flaps at the take-off setting until a safe height has been reached and until the undercarriage has been raised.

    NOTE: Pilots with considerable experience of the type may find it possible to climb away at loads up to 62000 lbs. Performance is affected by the position of the undercarriage at the time of engine failure, and depends upon which engine fails ( e.g. failure of the starboard outer engine has the worst effect ).

    Engine failure in flight

    With any one engine out of action, the aircraft can maintain height at any load.

    With two engines out of action, difficulty will be experienced in maintaining height at any load over about 50000 lbs and therefore jettisoning may be necessary.

    A speed of 145 MPH ( or more if foot load with full trim is excessve ) should be maintained.

    Undercarriage emergency operation

    The approximate times for raising and lowering the units are as follows:

    Later aircraft
    Main wheels: Lowering 5.5 mins; raising, 14 mins
    Tail wheels: Lowering 4 mins

    Early aircraft
    Main wheels: Lowering, 8.5 mins ( can't be manually raised )
    Tail wheels: Lowering, 4 mins

    Fuel System Management

    Takeoff on tanks 2 and 4
    45 gallons are used for each engine for starting, take-off and initial climb to about 3000 ft
    Switch to tanks 7 and 3
    switch to tank 6 when 10 gallons are left in tank 3
    switch to tank 5 when 10 gallons are left in tank 6
    Switch to tank 1 when 10 gallons are left in tank 7
    Switch to tank 2 when 10 gallons are left in tank 1
    Switch to tank 4 when 10 gallons are left in tank 5

    The above sequence in use of tanks is recommended for the following reasons:

    (a) Nos 1 and 3 tanks should not be used for starting, take-off or steep climbing ( as when taking evasive action, etc ) because in a tail down attitude they are below the level of the fuel pumps and there is a risk of fuel starvation. They should however be used early in flight to prevent the CG moving too far aft.

    (b) No.7 tanks should be used early in flight as they are not self-sealing

    (c) If it is essential that maximum manoeuverability be attained as early in flight as possible, Nos 6 tanks may be used before Nos 3, but Nos3 should, in any case, be used before any bomb load is dropped for CG reasons

    General Notes

    (a) If it is desired to use all possible fuel from each tank, wait until warning light comes on but then change over immediately. If contents gauges indicate the probability of two tanks on one side running dry simultaneously, change over on one while say 10 gallons still remain; this tank can be emptied later, after changing over on the other.

    (b) No tank should be used for more than one engine at a time over enemy territory. Whenever one tank on each side is being used for both engines on that side, avoid allowing both to run out simultaneously as in (a) above.

    (c) When there is a possibility of having to ditch the aircraft, it is advisable to leave 50 gallons in each No.5 tank to use while ditching so that contents of Nos.2 and 4 tanks can be completely jettisoned. If all tanks excepting Nos.2 and 4 are empty, in the event of ditching use the contents of one tank with the inter engine balance **** on, and jettison the contents of the other.

    (d) Towards the end of the flight, the contents of Nos.2 and 4 tanks should be equalised by opening inter engine balance cocks.

    (e) For landing, should fuel be very short, run on No4 tanks - inter engine balance cocks on - until 10 gallons remain; then open No.2 tank cocks and close balance cocks. When fuel pressure warning lights indicate than No.4 tanks are running dry, close No.4 tank cocks and open inter engine balance cocks. Allow 5 minutes between changeover on port and starboard sides to avoid two engines cutting simultaneously. The sequence of using Nos.4 and 2 tanks may be reversed if defective gauges make this desirable.

    (f) If one or more gauges become unserviceable the consumption from the tanks concerned can be checked by comparison with another tank feeding an engine running at the same boost and rpm.

    (g) Numbers 2 and 4 tanks should always be turned on when the fuel system is in imminent danger of being damaged, i.e. in fighter belts, target area, etc
     
  7. wells

    wells Member

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    Check it out
     

    Attached Files:

  8. vikingBerserker

    vikingBerserker Well-Known Member

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    Nice! Thanks Wells
     
  9. brewerjerry

    brewerjerry Active Member

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    Hi
    Thanks for the upload, excellent .:D
    cheers
    Jerry
     
  10. krieghund

    krieghund Member

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    Superb!!! Most appreciated.
     
  11. Snautzer01

    Snautzer01 Well-Known Member

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    very nice, thank you
     
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