Some rare information on the Ta-152.

Discussion in 'Stories' started by Soundbreaker Welch?, Jun 8, 2009.

  1. Soundbreaker Welch?

    Soundbreaker Welch? Active Member

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    #1 Soundbreaker Welch?, Jun 8, 2009
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2009
    From this article about the FW 190 series. The pilot who is writing this was a test pilot for the British in WWII. So he knows what he's talking about.

    Flying the FW 190: Kurt Tank's Butcher Bird | Flight Journal | Find Articles at BNET

    The high regard in which the Fw 190 and its designer Kurt Tank were held by the German Air Ministry was demonstrated when the authorities allowed him to use the first two letters of his surname to prefix all subsequent Focke-Wulf designs. The first such design was the Ta 152H, which was powered by a 1,880hp Junkers Jumo 213E/B engine that could be boosted to 2,250hp by MW-50 water/methanol or GM-1 nitrous-oxide injection. It had a longer span and a higher aspect ratio wing for greater altitude capabilities than the previous Fw 190 series; it also had a pressurized cabin and two 20mm wing cannon and an engine-mounted 30mm cannon-a further increase in armament-dispensation rate. This was probably the greatest armament on any production fighter in the War until the Me 262 jet aircraft came into being with four 30mm cannon. The Ta 152H's landing gear had an even wider track than the 190.

    When I flew the Ta 152H-1, my impression was that it had lost the aesthetic appeal of the earlier Fw 190s. On the ground, the cockpit view was terrible because the nose was two feet longer than the Dora's owing to the armament installation. Takeoff was, however, commendably short, and initial climb was steep. The Ta 152H really came into its own at above 35,000 feet. Using GM-1 nitrous-oxide injection, it was claimed by the Germans to have a service ceiling of 48,500 feet and a top speed of 472mph (760km/h) at 41,000 feet. Rate of roll was noticeably less, and maneuvering stick force per G was greater than that of earlier 190s; although longitudinal stability had improved, an autopilot was fitted, as the Ta 152H had a range of 755 miles at 33,000 feet and 1,250 miles at 23,000 feet when equipped with a 54-gallon (218-liter) drop tank. But the Ta 152H arrived on the scene much too late and in too small a number to play any serious role in the air war.

    That's one of the few eyewitness accounts of the Ta-152 we have today. It's too bad the British didn't test it at altitudes of 40,000 feet, or reach the top speed. Perhaps the British were afraid to test it to the max and maybe lose a test pilot.
     
  2. snafud1

    snafud1 Member

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    Cool article. I think they should have pushed it harder myself.
     
  3. seesul

    seesul Active Member

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    In 90´s, Willi Reschke met British pilot who tested his Ta-152 W.Nr. 150168.
    Also after those years the British pilot said Tempest was better than Ta...
    WR said Ta was the best fighter he ever flew and this machine was his life insurance. It is written in his book too.
     
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