unknown planetary drive to identify

Discussion in 'Other Mechanical Systems Tech.' started by Kurtl, Jul 22, 2011.

  1. Kurtl

    Kurtl Member

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    gentlemen, today I need your specialists for mechanical systems. Look at the pictures attached. Could this planetary gear be a part of an aircraft? I found two of them on a mountain and it was heavy. Thanks for your help. I'm really interested in it. Regards - Kurtl
     

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  2. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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    It is from a propeller gear box. The serrations or splines on the shaft is where the propeller is put on. Any markings or numbers?
     
  3. wuzak

    wuzak Well-Known Member

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    Looks like a Farman style reduction gearing. I believe the American radials used epicyclic gear reduction (sun, planet and ring gears), as did BMWs. Bristol used Farman style reduction, but the prop shaft doesn't look like a Hercules.

    [​IMG]

    Maybe a Gnome Rhone radial?
     
  4. wuzak

    wuzak Well-Known Member

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    Having said that , I have found a picture of a Pratt and Whitney R-1830 with the Farman style reduction gearing.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The planet carrier even looks like the ones in your pictures.
     
  5. bob3170

    bob3170 Member

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    And I thought from the thread title, you had discovered a crashed UFO:oops:
     
  6. Kurtl

    Kurtl Member

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    Gentlemen, thanks for your help. I believe that it is from a Pratt and Whitney R-1830. Unfortunatly I have not got the parts and they are still on their place. So I do not know if there are any numbers on it. Does anyone have a technical descripton with drawings of that engine?
    I'm thinking about recovering these parts. Who has experience in relieving it from all this rust?
     
  7. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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    Agree with it being from an 1830. If you look at the surrounding structure you might be able to determine based on any part numbers that might be visible. As far a removing the rust, it can probably be done mechanically (wire wheel) as it will never be used in an aircraft. You can also try WD-40 or LPS.
     
  8. Kurtl

    Kurtl Member

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    I thought about electrolysis or something like that to get also rid of the rust inbetween the theeth. Don't know what LPS is but WD-40 won't be enough I guess.
     
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