Which name is correct?

Discussion in 'Aircraft Requests' started by TimEwers, Jan 20, 2011.

  1. TimEwers

    TimEwers Member

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    When I posted about my 190 I used the instruction sheets spelling of Heinz Bar, But after looking at some threads Ive seen it spelled Baer , Are they two differant people?.

    I'm just wondering, If they are then I'll leave the spelling alone if not I'll change it to the correct spelling.
     
  2. DerAdlerIstGelandet

    DerAdlerIstGelandet Der Crew Chief
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    #2 DerAdlerIstGelandet, Jan 20, 2011
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2011
    No they are the same people.

    In German his name is actually spelled Heinz Heinrich Bär. The English spelling is Heinz Baer. The ae is pronounced the same way as ä is. That is just how it is spelled in English.

    Heinrich Bär is actually the correct spelling of his name.
     
  3. stona

    stona Well-Known Member

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    As above. English spellings of german words where the vowel has an "umlaut" often add an e after the vowel to approximate the effect of the "umlaut" on the vowel sound. I'm guessing in the age of print the umlaut symbol was unavailabe to English printers.
    The correct spelling is Bar with the umlaut but on the UK english keyboard I'm using now I would have to type Baer.

    From Wikipedia.

    "Um"+"laut" is German for "around/changed"+"sound". It refers to a historical sound shift in that language. In German, the umlaut diacritic is found as ä, ö and ü. The name is used in some other languages that share these symbols with German or where the Latin spelling was introduced in the 19th century, replacing marks that had been used previously. The phonological phenomenon of umlaut occurred historically in English as well (man ~ men; full ~ fill; goose ~ geese) in a way cognately parallel with German, but English orthography does not write the sound shift using the umlaut diacritic. Instead, a different letter is used.

    Cheers
    Steve
     
  4. imalko

    imalko Well-Known Member

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    As above, you will find this with many German names spelled in English. For instance Goering instead of Göring.
     
  5. Wurger

    Wurger Siggy Master
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    No wonder...the roots of these two languages are the same.
     
  6. stona

    stona Well-Known Member

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    Yes they are but modern English also incorporated Norman French with it's latin roots. It's one of the reasons why English has so many words.
    The word "smuggler" has its roots in the northern or germanic languages but the "contraband" they deal in obviously has latin roots and comes from medieval French.
    Steve
     
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