Aircraft materials used today

Discussion in 'Technical Requests' started by jo123, Jun 21, 2009.

  1. jo123

    jo123 New Member

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    I'm doing a project at the moment and need to work out what materials were used for aircraft skins at certain dates in history.

    I need to fill out a table that looks like this:

    | Date | Materials used for the aircraft skin | Type of air craft |
    | 1790 | silk .| Hot air balloon |

    I don't know if this is the right forum for this question but if anyone could help me it would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks
     
  2. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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    Broad question, here's a start

    2024 ALUMINUM for skins and either T-3 or T-4 depending on location. During WW2 it carried the designation of 24T. Still in use today.

    Get a copy of Advisory Circular 43.13, it's put out by the FAA, it might give you a good base for aluminum, wood and fabric used in aircraft construction.
     
  3. Stitch

    Stitch Banned

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    FLYBOYJ pretty much said; approximately 95% of the aircraft flying these days are made out of aircraft-grade aluminun alloy, with the other 5% made up of wood, stainless steel,titanium and various composites. Titanium was very popular in the '60's and '70's for the construction of exotic, high-performance aircraft, like the SR-71, but it was very difficult to manufacture back then. Nowadays, most high-performance aircraft (F-22, F-35, Eurofighter, etc.) use a lot of composite materials, like carbon-fiber, thermoset resins, and thermoplastics.
     
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