Aircraft Quirks

Discussion in 'Aviation' started by Dac, May 29, 2006.

  1. Dac

    Dac Member

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    Even some of the best aircraft of WW II had their quirks. The P-38 was either loved or hated by the men who flew it because of the attention it demanded. Even the P-51 had it's flaws after it was modified for long range escort. The 90 gallon fuel tank that helped give the plane such a long range also upset the trim and pilots had to be careful when flying with it full. Bud Anderson described how he swapped ends while yawing a Mustang in one of his first operational flights and felt lucky not to have crashed. He was later instructed that he needed to run the fuselage tank down to 45 gallons before doing any agressive maneouvers.

    I be interested in hearing about other aircraft with quirks that were otherwise sound machines.
     
  2. Jabberwocky

    Jabberwocky Active Member

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    Whenever you started up a Tempest or a Typhoon it was advisable to have a fire-extinguisher near-by.
     
  3. DerAdlerIstGelandet

    DerAdlerIstGelandet Der Crew Chief
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    That advisable for any aircraft on engine start up.
     
  4. cheddar cheese

    cheddar cheese Active Member

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    Whenever the crew of a 1930's french bomber walked out to their plane, they were blindfolded by the ground crew so that they wouldnt lose all confidence when they saw how ugly and wrong the plane looked...
     
  5. DerAdlerIstGelandet

    DerAdlerIstGelandet Der Crew Chief
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    :lol: Now that I can believe.
     
  6. paaln

    paaln Member

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    Time for a song:

    Don't give me a P-38 with props that counter-rotate
    They'll loop, roll and spin but they'll soon auger in
    Don't give me a P-38!

    CHORUS: Just make me Operations
    Way out on some lonely atoll
    For I am too young to die
    I just want to go home.*

    Don't give me a P-39 with an engine that's mounted behind
    It will tumble and roll and dig a big hole
    Don't give me a P-39.

    Don't give me an old Thunderbolt. It gave many pilots a jolt
    It looks like a jug and it flies like a tug
    Don't give me an old Thunderbolt!

    Don't give me a Peter Four Oh, a hell of an airplane, I know
    A ground loopin' *******. You're sure to get plastered
    Don't give me a Peter Four Oh.

    Don't give me a P-51, it was all right for fighting the hun
    But with coolant tank dry. you'll run out of sky
    Don't give me a P-51.

    Don't give me a P-61, for night flying is no fun
    They say it's a lark. but I'm scared of the dark
    Don't give me a P-61.
     
  7. DerAdlerIstGelandet

    DerAdlerIstGelandet Der Crew Chief
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  8. Twitch

    Twitch Member

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    Dac- yeah my Dad spent some time in P-51s and mentioned how tough it was to take off and get trimmed with a full fuel load. Very dicey stuff with the stick hauled back into your gut!
     
  9. Dac

    Dac Member

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    If the Luftwaffe had flown inderdiction missions over England they could have caught the P-51s when they were vulnerable. But then they would have come into range of British fighters.
     
  10. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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    WW2 - the P-38's heating system...


    Post war stuff;

    Soviet and East Block aircraft do not have toe brakes - they use a bicycle type hand brake on the stick and use differential braking for steering, aircraft with a nose landing gear have a castering nose gear. The brake systems are pneumatic. I know this system exist on AN-2, Mig-15, 17, 19, and 21 aircraft as well as L-29, 39 and the Iskra. Learing how to use this system could be harder than actually flying the aircraft...
     
  11. syscom3

    syscom3 Pacific Historian

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    In the PTO and CBI, the P38's heating system was never an issue.
     
  12. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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    Yea, no kidding! The guys in the background just took off their outter flight gear! :lol:

    [​IMG]
     
  13. pbfoot

    pbfoot Active Member

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    At lower levels heater would not be factor but at upper levels it certainly would it was known that some aircrew would take water up to altitude let it freeze so they would have ice to cool there beverages or for ice cubes
     
  14. syscom3

    syscom3 Pacific Historian

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    It must have been miserable for the ground crews for all the combatants that had to work on their arcraft in the hot climates.

    Touch a piece of metal and burn your hands!
     
  15. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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    Sunburn must of been hell! :evil4:

    Back to subject - the B-24 and it's fuel system...

    "But the B-24, because of some unfortunate habits and characteristics it had, required somewhat more crew training than most multi-place planes. With its archaic fuel system the B-24 was subject to fuel leaks, and it was a wise "Lib" pilot who flew with this bomb bay door cracked partially open to dissipate the potentially explosive fumes that collected throughout the the airplane.


    Lin never permitted smoking on his B-24 even though he was a smoker himself. The radio and various electrical motors throughout the bird were potential spark starters, and the pilot of a B-24 was prudent to shut off everything electrical that was possible during fuel transfer operations."


    http://members.aol.com/dheitm8612/requiem.htm
     
  16. syscom3

    syscom3 Pacific Historian

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    "A Marauder A day In Tampa Bay"

    The B26's had an alarming tendency to torque roll when an engine failed or prop went to flat pitch.

    Even with training, on takeoff, that could have been the end of many a pilots career.
     
  17. pbfoot

    pbfoot Active Member

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    How about the solenoids on the Avro Manchester switching the pitch on the props from course to fine and back by themselves with no indication to the pilots
     
  18. FLYBOYJ

    FLYBOYJ "THE GREAT GAZOO"
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    That's typical for any twin, especially one with a small wing span when compared to fuselage length. Having electric propellers just made a bad situation worse. What this showed was the need for extensive training when flying a twin-engine aircraft...
     
  19. Twitch

    Twitch Member

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    Flyboy- not only the P-38 heater was poor but the defroster was lousy too. Imagine not being able to see well out of the canopy. "Are those P-51s or 109s? Hmmm?" The Allisons were never set up properly for high altitude cold performance either producing many failures and aborts.
    [​IMG]
     
  20. V-1710

    V-1710 Member

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    I was told once that you couldn't open the side windows on a P-38 during flight because it would cause severe buffeting. Firing the cannon on early P-39's would throw the sights of the nose machine guns off. If a P-47 had a fuel leak, a wise pilot would point the nose down and bail out. The fuel tanks could leak into the bottom of the fuselage, and the gasoline would run back to the hot turbocharger, with unhappy results. Never ditch a P-51 in the water, the radiator air scoop cause the plane to sink very fast.
     
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