Does anyone fly RC warbirds?

Discussion in 'OFF-Topic / Misc.' started by proton45, May 1, 2012.

  1. proton45

    proton45 Member

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    I'm just wondering about flying RC aeroplanes...does anyone have experience with this hobby? Could someone point me in the direction of an online community, of people who like to fly WW2 RC aeroplanes? I need a place that I can (just sort of) research through a online forum or articles, or something. I'm intrigued by the hobby and I want to read up on it...I'm wondering about the "friendliest" scale to start with, and the advantages of electric vs gas power. A bunch of beginner questions that are probably best answered by reading old forum posted (ect).

    Thanks to anyone who can help. :eating:
     
  2. Torch

    Torch Well-Known Member

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    I wish, there's a couple of parks here that have RC areas(landing strip),tables etc geared for RC. Every once in awhile I'll catch a fly in. I would love to start. Thinking about Micro planes,basically 2 channel,throttle and rudder, You can even fly them indoors.Won't crash hard. I figure if i can fly those I might move up to electric. I watch a couple guys at the local high school fly a P51 and a winged thing. They really zip and most importantly they are quiet.
     
  3. proton45

    proton45 Member

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    It seems like a fun way to get closer to the subject. I like building "static" warbird models, and it would be interesting (and challenging) to build and fly scale warbirds. Just as a side comment...a lot of the RC aeroplanes I see, look plastic, or new. I wonder why people don't build their warbirds to look, battle damaged or used. I understand that their must be weight issues to consider...but it seems that exhaust stains and paint chipping would add minimal weight.
     
  4. javlin

    javlin Well-Known Member

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    I have thought about it a few times myself it seemed once one got pass the servos and controller it would get alittle cheaper.A buddy of mine use to do it and said one would definitly start on an upper winged plane like a Spirit of St.Louis,Cessna or sorts much easier to controll from what he said.The first time he and his buddies flew the Spit it crashed hard just to damn fast.
     
  5. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    I've only had a very small amount of experience flying R/C, but to fly scale first is a little like having your first driving lesson in a F1 Ferrari !
    As Kevin mentioned, it's best to start with a simple 'trainer'.
     
  6. Torch

    Torch Well-Known Member

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    Beginners dont keep their planes in one piece long enough to be weathered,crashed but not weathered.:D
     
  7. proton45

    proton45 Member

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    @Javlin Airframes...yea, that makes sense. The parasol or high wing configuration is the most stable in flight. For my "1st" training aeroplane, I have been looking at a basic foam airframe. It is the cheapest and most durable solution for my needs. I will probably not bother with decorating the airframe, after all...I'm sure that it will crash and burn, and need to be repaired... then crash burn (ect). I'm just looking at building flyable WW2 aeroplanes...somewhere, down the road.
    I could actually build an "Taylorcraft L-2" Grasshopper (LOL). That would be a great WW2 aeroplane...hiding a trainer beneath its olive-drab stars and stripes.
     
  8. gumbyk

    gumbyk Well-Known Member

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    You can also get RC simulators. Get some training in without risking anything.
     
  9. Torch

    Torch Well-Known Member

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    What scares me is i tried a simulator at a local hobby shop and i didnt do well, i know all the rudder,aileron etc functions and i thought i would do ok but still tanked a few times, lesson being start cheap..
     
  10. proton45

    proton45 Member

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    seems like good advice :eating:

     
  11. Bucksnort101

    Bucksnort101 Well-Known Member

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    #11 Bucksnort101, May 4, 2012
    Last edited: May 4, 2012
    I had the Great Planes simulator many years ago. I didn't find it too difficult to take off and fly most of the aircraft, that was with no wind or any other factors, but landing was a whole different story:shock: Helicoptors were a whole different kettle of fish, got the hand of hovering, then slow forward flight, but going from forward flight to hovering again was a killer.
     
  12. Thorlifter

    Thorlifter Well-Known Member

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    I flew planes and helicopters for a while and had the most fun with the cheap little ones. If you start with the low wing P-51 relica's or something like that, they are VERY difficult for a novice to control. In fact, I spent a little extra cash on a nice plane and flew it for all of 30 seconds before it hit a light pole.

    Good advise to start with a high wing trainer. And if your going to fly them, any of them, remember this. At some point, they will all crash. It may be a 30 second flyer like mine or you may have it for years, but it will crash at some point.

    Good luck.
     
  13. Torch

    Torch Well-Known Member

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  14. Torch

    Torch Well-Known Member

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  15. Night Fighter Nut

    Night Fighter Nut Well-Known Member

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    I've gotten to fly a couple of trainer planes. If you can, find a local flying club. Some of them have free time with their planes with a master-slave set up. This is where the pilot will get his plane off the ground then once in the air, give you a chance to fly it for awhile. If you get into any trouble, the other guy will take over. Torch, I don't know where you are in Colorado but if you are anywhere near Arvada, the local flying club there has such an arrangement. Every Thursday afternoon until October there is a free flying lesson given with the clubs planes. They have this set up I just mentioned and you don't need to bring anything but yourself. :)
     
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