F2G

Discussion in 'Aircraft Picture Requests' started by Wad Cutter, Oct 17, 2004.

  1. Wad Cutter

    Wad Cutter New Member

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    I would like to know how many F2G's served in World War II and between what years. Thanks :?:
     
  2. evangilder

    evangilder "Shooter"
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    I doubt any actually fought in combat. The first production F2G was delivered on July 15, 1945. You have to figure carrier qualifications and pilot training before the airplanes are used for actual missions. The contract order was for five F2G-1s and five F2G-2s. 5 additional F2G-2 models were built for a total of 10 of those.
     
  3. NightHawk

    NightHawk Member

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    March of 1944, Pratt Whitney requested a F4U-1 Corsair from Vought Aircraft for evaluation of their new P&W R-4360,28 cylinder engine. Vought transferred F4U-1, BuNo 02460 (Birdcage Canopy) to seeif the airframe and engine were compatible. The tests proved successfuland Goodyear Aircraft of Akron, Ohio was given the F2G program. (Source: N. Veronico "F4U Corsair" - B. Kinzey "F4U Corsair Vol.1)

    BuNo 13471-XF2G-1: The first FG1 model to test the R-4360 engine.
    5/31/44) The aircraft still retained the FG1 cockpit and turtle deck. It had a 14ft., 4 blade propeller, top deck carburetor intake and a long cowl. (Yellow cowl with Blue #5) (Source: Squadron "F4U Corsair In Action "No.29 - N. H. Hauprich, Goodyear)

    BuNo 13472-XF2G-1: Same as 13471. (Cowl No. unknown) Stricken from Navy records 4/30/46. (Source: N. Veronico "F4U Corsair")

    BuNo14091-XF2G-1: The rear deck was modified to accept a P-47D bubble canopy. It still retained the R-2800 engine, FG1cowling and the 3 blade propeller. (Source: Squadron "F4U Corsair In Action No.29 - N. H. Hauprich, Goodyear)

    BuNo 14092-XF2G-1: Same as 14091 (092 on cowling) Tested at Akron and NAS Patuxent from 4/44 to 2/45. Stricken from Navy records 11/30/45. (Source: N. Veronico "F4U Corsair" – Squadron "F4U Corsair in Action:)

    BuNo 14691-XF2G-1W The first aircraft manufactured as a true F2G- 1. It used the engine from 13471. First aircraft, to have the 12 inch auxiliary rudder. (Yellow cowl with Blue #9) It was tested at Akron and NAS Patuxent from 10/44 to 6/47 Stricken Navy records 6/30/47. (Source: N. Veronico "F4UCorsair" - N. H. Hauprich, Goodyear)

    BuNo 14692-XF2G-1: (Blue and Yellow checkerboard cowl with Zinc Chromate nose ring) Aircraft crashed and was destroyed in Akron, Ohio 12/12/45. (Source: D. Armstrong "I Flew Them First N. H. Hauprich, Goodyear)

    BuNo 14693-XF2G-1: N5590N Race #94: First aircraft to have the extended carburetor intake, these tests were conducted at Pratt Whitney in 1944. The aircraft was then tested at NAS Patuxent until it was obtained by Navy veteran Cook Cleland. In the 1947 Thompson Trophy Race, it was flown to second place by pilot Dick Becker.(1947 Color: White with Insignia Red trim, letters and numbers) It failed to finish in 1948. Piloted by owner Cook Cleland, the aircraft won the 1949 Thompson Trophy Race.(1949 Color: All White with Black letters and numbers) After Air Racing ended in Cleveland, the aircraft was used by the Cleveland Airport Fire Dept. for training purposes. It was destroyed in 1955. The R-4360 engine and four bladed propeller were obtained by Crawford Auto And Air Museum. It was stricken from Navy records ?/31/49 ?(Source: N. Veronico "F4U Corsair" - D. Jones, 3 View Drwgs.)
    BuNo 14694-XF2G-1: N91092 Race #18: The aircraft was tested at Mustin Field, Penna. and NAS Patuxent from 10/45 to 5/47. Stricken from Navy records 5/31/47. It was purchased by pilot Ron Puckett and raced in the 1947 and 1949 Nat. Air Races. 1947 Color: Blue with Orange cowl and tail cone. White letters and numbers; 1949 Colors: Light Gray and Light Blue. Light Blue letters and numbers.) Fate unknown. (Source N. Veronico "F4U Corsair" - D. Jones, 3 View Drwgs.)

    BuNo 14695-XF2G-1: The final F2G prototype. Damaged by crane boom After crash landing in Akron OH and later scrapped (Source: D. Armstrong "I Flew Them First")

    Production F2G-1 aircraft were land-based fighters with manually folding wings and 14ft. Propellers. F2G-2 aircraft had hydraulic operated folding wings, 13ft. propellers and carrier arresting hooks.

    BuNo 88454-F2G-1: This was the first production F2G. It was tested at NAS Patuxent and NAS Norfolk from 1945 to 1948. Stricken from Navy records 5/31/48. Obtained by W. Ohlrich in 1973. Since 1978, it resides at the Champlin Fighter Museum in Mesa, Arizona. (Source: N. Veronico "F4U Corsair")

    BuNo 88455-F2G-1: Tested at Goodyear from 8/45 to 5/46. Stricken from Navy records 8/31/46. Scrapped (Source: N. Veronico "F4U Corsair")

    BuNo 88456-F2G-1: Tested at Port Columbus, Oh. and NAS Patuxent from 9/45 to 3/46. Stricken from Navy records 5/31/47. Scrapped. (Source: N. Veronico "F4U Corsair")

    BuNo 88457-F2G-1: N5588N Race #84: Stricken from Navy records 4/30/47.Sold to owner Cook Cleland and flown by pilot Tony Janazzo in the 1947 Thompson Trophy Race.(Color: Black with White letters and numbers) The aircraft crashed on the seventh lap of the race, killing the pilot.(9/47) Registration Number would later be used on F2G-1 Race #57.(Source: N. Veronico "F4U Corsair" - D. Jones, 3 View Drwgs.)

    BuNo 88458-F2G-1: N5588N Race #57: Tested at Port Columbus, Oh. and NAS Patuxent from 10/45 to 7/46. Stricken from Navy records 1/48. The aircraft was purchased by Cook Cleland, supposedly for spare parts. Registration number BuNo 88457, N5588N was utilized. The aircraft was flown by pilot Ben McKillen Jr. in the 1949 Tinnerman and Thompson Trophy Races. (Color: Red and White with Black Letters and Numbers.) After Air Racing, the aircraft went through a series of owners; John Trainor of New Hampshire, Harry Doan of Florida, Don Knapp of Florida, the Lone Star Museum of Texas and a private collector in Kansas. In 1996, It was acquired by Robert Odegaard of Kindred, ND. who restored it to be the only flying F2G Corsair. (Source: N: Veronico "F4U Corsair" - N. H: Hauprich; Goodyear - Bill Meixner, Air Race Historian)

    BuNo 88459-F2G-2: Tested at Goodyear and NAS Patuxent from 10/45 to 6/46.
    Checkerboard cowl. Ended up as ground target. (Source: N. Veronico "F4U Corsair")

    BuNo 88460-F2G-2: Tested at NAS Norfolk and scrapped. Stricken from Navy records 5/31/48.(Source: N. Veronico "F4U Corsair")

    BuNo 88461-F2G-2: Aircraft saw service with the fleet, NAS North Island,San Diego from 4/46 to 1/47. Stricken from Navy records 5/47 and scrapped (Source: N. Veronico "F4U Corsair")

    BuNo 88462-F2G-2: Aircraft also saw service with the fleet at North Island San Diego. Stricken from Navy records 5/47 and scrapped. (Source: N. Veronico "F4U Corsair")

    BuNo 88463-F2G-2: N5577N Race #74: Used for training at NAS Jacksonville, Fla. Stricken from Navy records 2/28/47. Pilot Cook Cleland purchased the aircraft and flew it first place in the 1947 Thompson Trophy Race. It was also flown in the 1948 and 1949 Nat. Air Races by pilot Dick Becker, but failed to finish. (Color: Slate Blue, Blue and White checkerboard cowl. White trim, letters and numbers.) The aircraft was purchased by Walter Soplata of Newbury, Oh. in 1953. In 1997, the Western Reserve Hist. Society of Cleveland, Oh. purchased the aircraft. At the present time, the W.R. Hist. Society is having Robert Odegaard of Kindred, N. Dakota restore the aircraft. (N. Veronico "F4U Corsair") –Society of Air Racing Historians
     

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  4. evangilder

    evangilder "Shooter"
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  5. NightHawk

    NightHawk Member

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    uops, forgot thet sorry :lol:
     

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  6. Salim

    Salim Member

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    Do you guys think the F2G was the best variant of the Corsair? I think it would pass out as such since it had far greater horsepower than the other models, and as such would be able to perform better with its maximum load of 4,000 lbs of bomb!
     
  7. jpatrick62

    jpatrick62 New Member

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    It was perhaps the best interceptor of the bunch, and it provided fantaastic performance at SL. However, for all around performance, I think the F4U-4 was the best of the WW2 bunch..
     
  8. JCook

    JCook New Member

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    A number of F2Gs were based at NAS Ford Island, PH post WWII
    [​IMG]F2G-2 taxies out at NAS Ford Island with Lt Starkes at the controls. (J. Genee Photo)
     
  9. merlin540

    merlin540 Member

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    One of my all-time favorites! Thanks for the pic.
     
  10. merlin540

    merlin540 Member

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    Here's a pic- and plans for the F2G.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  11. merlin540

    merlin540 Member

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    Here's more plans for the F2G Corsair.

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
  12. r2800doublewasp

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    By the way doesn't walter soplata have one of these?
     
  13. Torch

    Torch Well-Known Member

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    another pic.
     

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  14. renrich

    renrich Active Member

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    The F2G was a disappointment with no better performance than the F4U4 and not as good as F4U5.
     
  15. merlin540

    merlin540 Member

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    I know that was the conventional wisdom- but Cook Cleland, Ron Puckett, and Dick Becker would probably have taken issue with that one........:lol:
     
  16. merlin540

    merlin540 Member

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    #16 merlin540, May 30, 2009
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2009
    Here's one that I KNOW no one has.............

    [​IMG]
     
  17. Catch22

    Catch22 Well-Known Member

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  18. Sweb

    Sweb Member

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    The F2G was an exceedingly better performer than the F4U4 and The F4U5 was a derated aircraft designed for ground support duty and had zero high altitude performance. The F2G was designed to "'get it" up to altitude quickly, as was the F8F Bearcat, to counter the Japanese kamikaze threat. The expression "climbs like a homesick angle" was coined with the performance of the F2G. 6000 feet per minute climb is in the neighborhood of twice that of any preceding Corsair or other prop driven aircraft of the time. It could almost hang on its prop and climb. Read the book Whistling Death by Boone Guyton. He was the test pilot for the Corsair series. There were few aircraft at the time of its introduction that could match its performance. It was just too late to the party.
     
  19. merlin540

    merlin540 Member

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    I talked to F2G test pilot Don Armstrong's widow at some lenght about the F2G. She said her husband shared the same sentiments that you posted here. I'm a big fan of Corsairs in general- and F2G's in particular. I realize that Corsairs (like all aircraft) had their teething problems, but what a magnificent brute that F2G was! Thanks lots for your input on this brutally awesome aircraft!
     
  20. merlin540

    merlin540 Member

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    A colorized version of an Oahu F2g...

    [​IMG]
     
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