Fieseler F 156 Storch - ultralight replica

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Parmigiano

Senior Airman
691
8
Aug 2, 2005
Campospinoso (PV), Italy
I don't know if this thread should stay here or in the 'off topic', eventually some admin can move it.
Anyway, I think it might be interesting and is in a certain way about WW2 planes

There is this Aussie guy, Nestor Slepcev, who managed to build a 3/4 replica of the Storch and sell the kit.

I can testify that it is not a joke, a group of friends of mine actually assembled and fly it (yes, I was flying ultralights aircraft, unfortunately for several reasons I decided to sell my kite in 2004!), and t is a gorgeus plane.
The plane really stalls at 35 Kmh (22 Mph)! There was a demo video where Slepcev was flying low with full flaps and a guy was running ahead of him on the strip: the guy actually outpaced the Storch!

It took them almost 2 years and about $ 40.000, but it was worth.

Some years ago Slepcev was working on a ultralight replica of the Me 109G, I saw pictures and a video but now seems to be disappeared from the net, and the 109 is not mentioned in his site.

Here some links about the Slepcev Storch

http://www.storch.com.au/
http://www.ulm.it/fly_in/test/slepcev/default_en.htm
http://www.ultralightflyer.com/storch/
 

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I've done this in my -150. I could turn into a moderate head wind, go full flaps and just about hover. Mind you I'm on the verge of stalling, but it can be done.

In this homebuilt Storch it seems this could be done almost on a daily basis!
 
Well, a little personal experience.
It never happened to fly backwards, but with my kite (a Canadian designed Beaver Rx 550 with Rotax 582) it happened to fly very very slow. In cold whater and only pilot on board the thing stalled at 36 mph, and with a strong headwind it was possible to fly as fast as a walking man.
The only advice was not to stay too low, because if the wind would cease then you are in stall.
Luckily the Beaver was a good 'family father' and his stall was just pointing the nose down with a very light buffeting...
 
the lancaster kicks ass said:
must be hard to controll as well.........

Not really - you want at least 1500' AGl just in case you stall - I have seen guys do this a few feet above a runway. :shock:

Parmigiano said:
The only advice was not to stay too low, because if the wind would cease then you are in stall.
Luckily the Beaver was a good 'family father' and his stall was just pointing the nose down with a very light buffeting...

Exactly - I wouldn't do this in an aircraft that drops a wing hard in a stall!
 
In the High desert here, I've seen a J-3 Piper Cub both hover and fly slower than the wind was blowing. :shock: It was pretty freaky and I was very glad I didn't have to land it.

wmaxt
 

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