German use of napalm during 1941?

Discussion in 'Aviation' started by davebender, May 30, 2013.

  1. davebender

    davebender Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like Luftwaffe aircraft were using napalm (or something similar) during 1941. What do you think?
     
  2. Matt308

    Matt308 Glock Perfection
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    Phosphorus is not napalm.
     
  3. tyrodtom

    tyrodtom Well-Known Member

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    Napalm is just thickened gasoline, parafine, naptha, etc. jellied by adding polystrene. Sometimes a phosphorus booster/fuze is used to set off the mixture, but there's no phosphorus in the napalm itself.
     
  4. davebender

    davebender Well-Known Member

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    That's modern napalm.

    During WWI and WWII various mixtures were used for flame fuel. For instance some types of powdered laundry soap can be used to thicken gasoline.
     
  5. tyrodtom

    tyrodtom Well-Known Member

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    #5 tyrodtom, May 30, 2013
    Last edited: May 30, 2013
    True dave. One of my duties in the USAF at NKP, Thailand, was making napalm.
    There's lots of different methods of thickening gasoline, some are not so safe though.
    You can't mix phosphorus with any combustible liquid and expect to survive the attempt though. Some varities of phosphorus will ignite at room temprature on exposure to air.
    Mixing the napalm with styrene as the thickening agent makes the napalm much more sticky.
     
  6. davebender

    davebender Well-Known Member

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    David Glantz performed the translation from Russian. In parenthesis he suggests Colonel Ivanin is referring to napalm. That certainly makes more sense to me then phosphorus which is normally used (by military) for producing smoke.
     
  7. davebender

    davebender Well-Known Member

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  8. tyrodtom

    tyrodtom Well-Known Member

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    #8 tyrodtom, May 30, 2013
    Last edited: May 30, 2013
    No they also used phosphorus in bombs. Very effective in starting fires, used on vehicles, stuctures, gruesome when used as a anti-personnel weapon.
    The onlt way you can put it out is to completely cut it off from oxygen permnentely. You can submerge it in water as long as you want, pull it out, it'll reignite itself.
    Small amounts are used in marking rounds, rockets, and smoke granades.
     
  9. stona

    stona Well-Known Member

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    A convenient way around various conventions to which we have signed up.

    It is used as an offensive weapon by several nations who shouldn't be using it in this capacity.

    Cheers

    Steve
     
  10. davebender

    davebender Well-Known Member

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  11. Snautzer01

    Snautzer01 Well-Known Member

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    #11 Snautzer01, May 31, 2013
    Last edited: May 31, 2013
    see here mixture 30% benzine 70% petroleum

    Clipboard01.jpg Clipboard02.jpg Clipboard03.jpg Clipboard04.jpg
     
  12. davebender

    davebender Well-Known Member

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    Multiple sources state German Army flame fuel consisted of low grade gasoline thickened with tar.

    Germany had a bottomless supply of coal tar as a byproduct of coke production for making steel. German chemists used it to make everything from dyestuff to Bayer aspirin. Makes sense to use it for flame fuel if it will work as a thickener.
     
  13. tyrodtom

    tyrodtom Well-Known Member

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    Germany may have had a bottomless supply of coal tar, but they didn't have a lot of excess bezene or other petroleum products.
    Thickener doesn't help a lot with a shortage of the product you want to thicken.
     
  14. davebender

    davebender Well-Known Member

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    1941 Germany was short of almost everything except coal, steel and aluminum. I doubt low grade gasoline (from natural petroleum) was any more scarce then rubber, copper, tungsten, chromium, etc.
     
  15. tyrodtom

    tyrodtom Well-Known Member

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    Good idea, run em out of gasoline even sooner.
     
  16. Civettone

    Civettone Active Member

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    White phosperous was a common weapon in WW2. I do not see any reason why Glantz would confuse this with Napalm. I gather he merely made a reference of comparison. Originally napalm was with palm oil, quite impossible for the Germans to acquire in sufficient amounts. But if he is referring to something 'like napalm', it would still be far fetched. The German Flammwaffen would be closer to napalm.

    Kris
     
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