How Hard is it to Drop Flaps??

Discussion in 'Building Questions, Tutorials and Guidebooks' started by marcus4hire, Mar 5, 2011.

  1. marcus4hire

    marcus4hire Member

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    Hi All:

    So far, every reply has helped me inch along on my model so I figured I would keep going and seeing if I could stump ya!

    When I got back into modeling I intended to focus on 1/48. But, being an anal retentive rivet counter with a novice's skill didn't work too well. So, after ruining a couple of 1/48 planes I decided to do some 1/72 to improve technique without being tempted to get carried away with advanced detail.

    Sorry, on to my question.

    I have been working on a 1/72 B model Mustang (Academy) and have surprised even myself with how well the cockpit turned out! I would like to continue with the build by dropping the flaps. Currently, flaps and wings are together as one piece with the flaps up. I would like to cut them out and drop them but didn't know how hard it is or what I am getting myself into.

    So, any tips on how to drop them?? Should I glue top and bottom wing together and then cut? Or do it separately and then glue together? What do I cut with? A razor saw seems like it would lose too much material, I have heard of string or dental floss. Does this work? Is one better than the other? Have you ever done it? If so, are there any tips to share? Do I ask too many questions?

    Appreciate any help!
     
  2. Wurger

    Wurger Siggy Master
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    #2 Wurger, Mar 5, 2011
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2011
    It is not too hard to do it. Also it's not true that a razor-saw loses too much of material. Of course it depends on how the cutting edge is thick.Here you are an example of separating flaps and ailerons from a wing ( Academy Fw-190A of 1/72 scale ). The aircraft had a different flaps than P-51. But the way of making them separate is the same for both flap types. Personaly I cut off flaps when wing halves aren't put togeter. Then I glue both halves of a flap and add the leading edge. For this part you can use a piece of the sprue frame or a strip od styrene. The leading edge of a flap needs to be sanded for its shaping.....
     

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  3. Wurger

    Wurger Siggy Master
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    Also you should remember if there was seen any structure of a wing when flaps were open it should be added as well.
     

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  4. marcus4hire

    marcus4hire Member

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    #4 marcus4hire, Mar 5, 2011
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2011
    Perfect! I intend to do the 190 pictured next!

    So a razor saw is acceptable? I have one but was also considering string/floss for maybe a bit more precision. Nice to know it can be done and isn't difficult.

    I had thought much the same as yourself with regards to the leading edge and will research to see if any extra detail needs to go in. I'm about ready to try it.

    Thanks!

    Oh, one last question. That diagram you are using in the photos. Where can you get those? Is that just an odd one out of the back of a book you have ran through a copier to get it to scale? Or is a specific book of those or other product that you buy separately? Seen those on other photos but had never asked. They look darned handy instead of referencing a small stack for this and that detail.

    ETA: Just wanted to say thanks for going through the trouble of posting several relevant photos. A lot of people in a lot of forums wouldn't do that. Why I like this place.
     
  5. Wurger

    Wurger Siggy Master
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    The diagram you have noticed is a part of drawings for Fw190A. These are from a book series of Kagero publisher about the aircraft. Of course the series isn't the only one. There are other books with nice drawings for almost all planes. As a modeller I collect all books that can come in handy and can help with finding pictures of plane , its details, profiles etc... If drawings aren't in my favourite scale I resize them down using Xero device in order to get a correct copy of these.

    If you are interested in my way of making models you might have a look at the thread...

    http://www.ww2aircraft.net/forum/gr...rmjager-sturmstaffel1-16915.html?daysprune=-1

    The model of the Fw190A hasn't been finished yet but you can see how the process runs.
     
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