Japanese engine sizes

Discussion in 'Aviation' started by Shortround6, Nov 12, 2013.

  1. Shortround6

    Shortround6 Well-Known Member

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    #1 Shortround6, Nov 12, 2013
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2013
    TO keep from derailing the Corsair vs Zero thread any more here are the major Japanese radial engines:


    engine type..................cylinders.........diameter..........weight..........displacement

    Mitsubishi Zuisei............14.................1118mm..........540kg.............28L (1708 ci?)
    Nakajima Sakae (early)...14.................1150mm..........530kg.............27.9L (1702 ci?)
    Nakajima Sakae (late).....14.................1150mm.........590kg.............27.9L (1702 ci?)
    Mitsubishi Kinsei.............14................1218mm.........545kg.............32.3L (1971 ci?)
    Nakajimi Ha-41..............14.................1260mm.........630kg.............37.5L (2287 cu?)
    Nakajima Ha-109...........14.................1260mm..........720kg............37.5L (2287 cu?)
    Mitsubishi Kasei.............14................1340mm...........780kg............42L ( 2567ci ?)
    Nakajima Mamori............14................1380mm...........870kg............49L ( 2989ci ?)
    Nakajima Homare...........18.................1180mm..........835kg............35.8L (2183ci ?)

    I would note that the Mamori was not exactly a success and about 200 were built. Also when the A6M8 was built with the Kinsei engine the cowl gun/s were deleted.
    The Nakajima Ha-41 and Mitsubishi Kasei were originally bomber engines.
    Weights for Japanese engines can vary depending on model.

    American engines for comparison

    P W R-1830...........14.................1221mm...........662kg*..............30L
    Wright R-2600..........14..................1377mm..........886kg................42.7L
    P W R-2800...........18..................1326mm..........1043kg..............45.9L

    Wright R-1820...........9..................1400mm..........442-617kg............29.9L

    Low weight is for an early 890hp ungeared version, high weight is for post war 1425hp version. 1200hp versions were around 599KG


    Weights for american engines are for early war single stage, two speed engines.
     
  2. Ivan1GFP

    Ivan1GFP Member

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    Thanks Shortround,

    Can you also include data for the R-1820 for completeness.

    Thanks.
    - Ivan.
     
  3. N4521U

    N4521U Well-Known Member

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    I thought it would be tiny, tinier, and pocket size................ sorry
     
  4. cherry blossom

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    One might add the Mitsubishi Ha-104 (Ha 42 in the unified system) as it powered the Ki-67. It used the same cylinder bore and stroke as the Kasei but with 18 cylinders.

    engine type..................cylinders.........diameter.. ........weight..........displacement

    Mitsubishi Ha-104............18.................1372 mm....... ..1140 kg.............54.1L (3301 ci)

    More generally, Mitsubishi and Nakajima each produced engines with three cylinder sizes. Typically they produced these in 14 cylinder and 18 cylinder versions, except that Mitsubishi never tried to make an eighteen cylinder engine using the Zusei cylinders. The Mitsubishi engine using 18 Kinsei cylinders was the Ha 43 and it powered the A7M2 Reppu and Ki-83 prototypes but a combination of earthquakes and B-29 raids prevented major production. The Nakajima Ha 44 and Ha 217 used the Ha 41/Ha 109 and the Mamori cylinder sizes respectively but were not used in service.

    The take home message is that both companies were designing and testing too many engines. The problem for the Army and Navy was deciding which engines to abandon. With hindsight we can see that the Mitsubishi Zusei always produced slightly less power than the Nakajima Sakae and could have been replaced in all its applications without any cost. We can also see that the Mamori and Ha 217 were never reliable. Had the Navy insisted that the B6N1 used the Kasei, it might have been ready for service in the Guadalcanal Campaign. At the time it was probably harder, especially as Nakajima was a politician and the early Kasei engines didn't have quite the same power for take off.
     
  5. Shortround6

    Shortround6 Well-Known Member

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    thank you the extra information. I limited the the list to the engines available in the early part of the the war and threw in the Homare because most people are familiar with it.

    The Japanese certainly did spread too few engineers over too many projects, wither it was engines, air frames, weapons, etc. The almost total lack of co-operation between the Army and Navy ( it seems that each would rather be destroyed than co-operate or take 2nd place to the other) is amazing and much worse than what the Germans were doing.
     
  6. stan reid

    stan reid Member

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    #6 stan reid, Nov 14, 2013
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2013
    I don't have any details but they also had some water-cooled inverted V12 engines like the Kawasaki Ha-40 and Ha-140.
     
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