Japanese green cross aircraft,pics and story.

Discussion in 'Aviation' started by Torch, Jul 21, 2014.

  1. Torch

    Torch Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2006
    Messages:
    2,285
    Likes Received:
    217
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Colorado
    • Like Like x 2
  2. GrauGeist

    GrauGeist Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2008
    Messages:
    15,185
    Likes Received:
    2,027
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Public Safety Automotive Technician
    Location:
    Redding, California
    Home Page:
    Nice article, but the "Christian Cross" is not correct. The shape of a cross was one of the only icons not used by a national entity during the PTO and could not be mistaken for any other nationality.

    Also, the crosses may have been green to a certain degree, but they were more black (or actually black in some cases) than green.
     
  3. Greyman

    Greyman Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2009
    Messages:
    711
    Likes Received:
    130
    Trophy Points:
    43
    I don't think anyone that ever actually laid eyes on them has ever called them black ...
     
  4. Capt. Vick

    Capt. Vick Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2008
    Messages:
    7,869
    Likes Received:
    637
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Long Island, New York
    Yes there is a debate still raging over this. Interesting that the eyewitness at Le Shima in the article quotes it as green, so for me the question is this: Was he informed previous to their landing how they were going to be painted? Seems unlikely to this arm-chair general, but who knows how scuttlebutt was passed. And the second question is: Could pre-knowledge of how the "should" have been painted, prejudgest him against what he actually saw? O's Razor, the simplest answer to me is the film has aged to give the appearance of black, but that the crosses where infact green, or there abouts.

    One interesting note: I always painted the anti-glare strip infront of US WWII fighters black, when in fact they were mostly olive drab!
     
  5. GrauGeist

    GrauGeist Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2008
    Messages:
    15,185
    Likes Received:
    2,027
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Public Safety Automotive Technician
    Location:
    Redding, California
    Home Page:
    #5 GrauGeist, Jul 22, 2014
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2014
    Actually, Shinpachi has mentioned that the crews that painted them were being a little "defiant"...

    As far as fading is concerned, look at the color photos and you'll notice that the olive drab dungarees the GIs are wearing still has green coloration.

    *edit* here's the conversation regarding the black instead of green: http://www.ww2aircraft.net/forum/aircraft-markings-camouflage/green-cross-bear-39937.html#post1097496
     
  6. N4521U

    N4521U Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2009
    Messages:
    8,633
    Likes Received:
    224
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Occupation:
    reduced to all around slobbing
    Location:
    Miranda, NSW
    One of my GB12 entries.

    Hadn't seen all of them in one place before.
     

    Attached Files:

  7. Shinpachi

    Shinpachi Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2008
    Messages:
    6,782
    Likes Received:
    997
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    CGI Creator
    Location:
    Osaka
  8. Capt. Vick

    Capt. Vick Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2008
    Messages:
    7,869
    Likes Received:
    637
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Long Island, New York
    Yeah I know! Either way you come down on this issue, a great picture posting.
     
  9. Greyman

    Greyman Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2009
    Messages:
    711
    Likes Received:
    130
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Reading this paragraph, there's wiggle room for all eventualities:

    'The flight of these two Bettys became known as the Green Cross flights and the technique became the standard operating procedure for Japanese aircraft carrying envoys for surrender across the remnants of the Japanese empire for the next month. The only Japanese aircraft flying unmolested had to be approved and had to cover their old markings with the approved Green Cross standards. Not every aircraft complied with every detail of the specified paint scheme; not every aircraft was painted white nor every cross painted green, but scores of these surrender aircraft brought about the end of the killing and suffering and the beginning of the healing.'
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. bobbysocks

    bobbysocks Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2010
    Messages:
    3,809
    Likes Received:
    181
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    that is the first time i have seen that...how i missed it before i dont know. but very interesting.
     
Loading...

Share This Page