Just a thought....

Discussion in 'Modeling' started by Lucky13, Mar 31, 2009.

  1. Lucky13

    Lucky13 Forum Mascot

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    Have you ever wondered, if ANY of the pilots that we model our crates on, EVER gave it a thought that decades from now on, people will argue about the colour of the camouflage, size and style of the code, when, where and which type they flew and fought in and doing so, taking pride in their accomplished work, the model, when done? I know that they were a h*ll lot busy doing their best staying alive, to fight another day, thinking about families, friends and many times fallen comrades...
    I sometimes wonder how they felt and those that are still with us today feel, when we do our models based on their life experience during times of unrest...do they feel gratitude towards us doing our best not to forget to in some ways show our gratitude and respect towards them and what they did and suffered through?

    When does a model stop being a model?
     
  2. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Well Jan, I've only made two, maybe three models for WW2 veterans, but have done a fair few paintings where veterans have been involved, either as signatories to prints, or as the recipient of a 'surprise gift' from offspring or relataives. In all these instances, the initial reaction has been similar; one of silence, followed by a 'far away look', for want of a better description. This has often been followed by a distant smile and a guarded, one could almost say stunned, thank you.
    A little later, sometimes but not always, a story or two might emerge.
    I do know that those veterans who have been the recipients of original paintings, or prints, of 'their' aircraft, have always hung the picture in a place of honour, and always, without fail, they have mentioned it whenever I have spoken to them again.
    The thing is, I often wonder where their thoughts go when they view the picture.
    Terry.
     
  3. Bernhart

    Bernhart <b>2012 Forum Fantasy Football Champion</ b>

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    knew a guy who flew typhoons for the rcaf, there is a pic of his particular plane landing, It was taken at the end of the war, he said it always made him happy as he though how he and others were thinking at the end of the fighting
     
  4. Sweb

    Sweb Member

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    I painted an oil portrait of my Pop standing in the cockpit of his RF-51 from a period black/white photo as a tribute.

    Great question, though. No, I don't think they considered themselves in any light to be honorees of a future time and generation. My Pop simply did not understand my passion for that period in aviation history. One day when I was 13 he sat down with me and pointed to the 6 X .50 cal guns on the P-51 model I was working on and asked me what I thought happened to people when shot with such a weapon. With tears in his eyes and breaking voice he simply said "They explode" and walked out of the room. So, no, I doubt these men who were boys when they fought think much of the strange passion we have for their time. Mine didn't, anyway.
     
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