Machine gun powder marks.

Discussion in 'Painting Questions, Tutorials and Guidebooks' started by [SC] Arachnicus, Jul 9, 2012.

  1. [SC] Arachnicus

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    I am daring to try this. Is it a heavily diluted black?

    Will the finest point of a Pache airbrush do the trick?


    The first plane I want to do this on a a Corsair. I have no idea of weathering either, so advice would be appreciated.

    Tom
     
  2. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    It's a difficult thing to get right, whichever way you try, and takes lots of practice. The streaks from the gun smoke are very often depicted far too densely on models, in solid black. In fact, on the real thing, close up, although fairly dark, the staining is more of a dark grey, sometimes with a hint of blue (only just) depending on the ammunition, build-up of staining, and the colour of the surface.
    Here's an easier way to experiment with, before trying it on a model. Get a 'Chinagraph' wax pencil or, betterstill, a ladies eye-brow/eye-liner pencil. Draw a very light line, about a quarter, maybe a half, of the overall desired length, then smudge this lightly in the direction of airflow, with the tip of a finger, extending the line as required. This can then be diffused further with the tip of a cotton bud (Q Tip), when using this dry, or wet, will give varying effects.
    Try this first, a number of times, on a scrap of painted plastic, to get the feel for it.
     
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  3. Wayne Little

    Wayne Little Well-Known Member

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    Pastel Chalks are also an excellent way to achieve good results, apply directly onto your matt paint from gun port back over the wing and build it up. if you are not happy simply rub it off and start again, once done seal it with your gloss. alternatively do it at the end once you apply your final flat coat.

    Black is usually ok so long as you dont go too heavy, you can also then blend Dark grey as necessary to tone this down....practice, practice practice....!

    Exhausts, and other staining and weathering effects can also be done this way...
     
  4. Crimea_River

    Crimea_River Well-Known Member

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    And if you don't want to spring for pastel chalks, just rub a pencil on a piece of sand paper and use the powdered graphite. Also works just fine IMHO. Subtlety is the key so apply with a small paint brush a little at a time.
     
  5. [SC] Arachnicus

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    I have a dark grey pastel chalk. I'll play around with it and post the pics of any that look good.
     
  6. A4K

    A4K Well-Known Member

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    Good on ya Tom, and good advice guys.

    I use Dark Grey or Black artist pastels aswell, applied finely with a damp, not too wet, brush. Also good for undercarriage and engine washes.
     
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