Need help identifying prop (Father's 50th bday present)

Discussion in 'Basic' started by PropIdentity, Jan 25, 2015.

  1. PropIdentity

    PropIdentity New Member

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    Hello, I'm currently searching for a propeller for my Father for his 50th birthday present. I found one I think he'll like, but I'm having trouble identifying it. The seller believes it is a P-38 prop blade, which is what I am hoping for (his favorite warbird). If it is not from a P-38 I believe I will pass on it. I have not had much luck identifying it through pictures however I did find an account of a P-38 crashing in the general location it was recovered. I am hoping to get a piece with a story behind it, I feel that would be worth the extra money (3-4x the price of others).

    Any help identifying the propeller would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks! $_57 (3).JPG $_57.jpg $_57 (1).jpg
     
  2. PropIdentity

    PropIdentity New Member

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    Can anyone advise what plane this would be off of? Here's the numbers:
    DWG NO. 89301-6 CHG-E
    SER. NO. 39382
    SER. NO. AC
    HEAT TREAT NO-2712
    FORG NO. 26281

    There are also a couple proof stamps:
    "C 120" inside a circle (C 120)
    "C 46" inside a circle (C 46)
     
  3. stona

    stona Well-Known Member

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    US aircraft are not my thing, but propeller blades to that drawing number were fitted to early P-51s.

    Cheers

    Steve
     
  4. PropIdentity

    PropIdentity New Member

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    Thanks for the info, that's about all I can find about it.. Hoping to trace the serial # to a specific plane but not sure where to look.. Any insight is appreciated.
     
  5. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    It's unlikely that the prop serial numbers will lead to a specific airframe, but someone here might be able to advise.
     
  6. waroff

    waroff Member

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    #6 waroff, Mar 5, 2015
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2015
    exact,
    it was a Curtiss blade for hub C532D -F32
    angle low: 23°,
    angle high: 58°
    No other aircraft was fitted with this propeller. (P38s were fitted with 88996 or 89303)
    helice10.jpg
    Waroff
     
  7. PropIdentity

    PropIdentity New Member

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    Thanks for the info! I had assumed it was from an early P-51 however I did find a test where they were testing that prop on a p-40..

    I was really hoping to be able to trace it to a specific plane. The story is that it was recovered in the Netherlands from a plane crash that the Germans removed to study during WWII, so I haven't had much luck finding records since the Germans removed the crash debris during the war..
     
  8. fubar57

    fubar57 Well-Known Member

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    Nicely done Waroff.

    Geo
     
  9. GrauGeist

    GrauGeist Well-Known Member

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    However, the Germans did have records of recovered Allied aircraft, so if the Luftwaffe did recover that P-51 in the Netherlands, there is a chance that a record of the aircraft may exist in an archive somewhere.

    If you can also narrow down the date and the vicinity where the P-51 crashed, you can also reference USAAF MACR records to narrow down the aircraft's identity.
     
  10. PropIdentity

    PropIdentity New Member

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    Thanks a lot for the ideas, I hadn't thought of German records.. Hmm.. Unfortunately I don't have much info about when it was recovered..

    The story goes that the seller's father-in-law was a teenager during the war, him and his friends would try to aid downed allied pilots before the Germans got there and made it to a crash site (in Holland near Ijsselmeer) before the Germans and saw the propeller of the aircraft missing. The Germans came shortly after and removed the wreckage; then years later he found the propeller and a bunch of engine parts nearby and remembered the plane missing the prop from years before..

    I figured it was a good story, just wish we could trace it back to a specific plane..
     
  11. GrauGeist

    GrauGeist Well-Known Member

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    Well, it's not impossible to find the ID of the aircraft!

    There is a couple ways to do this.

    One way is to find a date of the downing. Then you can go through the USAAF archives and find a MACR that corresponds with the date.

    The other way, and it's a little more involved, but still can produce results, is to find exactly where the aircraft crashed at. Thousands of aircraft were down, but rarely did they land in the exact same spot. In otherwords, was it lost inside a city limits, or near a city or in the countryside (of a township), etc...

    Once you have found the location out, you can search through the MACR records to find aircraft that were downed in that area...then it's a process of elimination.

    So it's entirely possible that you will find out which aircraft it was, it will just take a little work :thumbleft:
     
  12. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    If this prop is from an early P-51, which I'm presuming means Allison-engined P-51A, Mustang MkI, MkIa etc, and was found in Holland, then it's more likely that the aircraft was in RAF service, rather than USAAF service. If it was in USAAF service, then it's more probably from a photo-recce unit.
     
  13. stona

    stona Well-Known Member

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    #13 stona, Mar 8, 2015
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2015
    Correct.

    As I understand it this would have been an aircraft with the UK designation Mustang I or IA and in UK service. These were not technically P-51s but went in the US by the factory numbers NA 73 and NA 91 respectively.

    Cheers

    Steve
     
  14. waroff

    waroff Member

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    #14 waroff, Mar 8, 2015
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2015
    According to interchangeability chart, A-36, P-51 had Curtiss propeller fitted with 89303-27w blade, and P-51 B C had Hamilton Standard propellers
     
  15. Marcel

    Marcel Well-Known Member

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    There is also a database of crashed aircraft here in the Netherlands. Although " near the IJsselmeer" is a bit vague.
     
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