Paint remover

Discussion in 'Painting Questions, Tutorials and Guidebooks' started by snafud1, Aug 4, 2009.

  1. snafud1

    snafud1 Member

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    Has anyone used a paint remover on any models that they had done and decided they didn't like it? If so , what do you recommend?
     
  2. Wurger

    Wurger Siggy Master
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    #2 Wurger, Aug 4, 2009
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2009
    To be honest the removing paint process always is dangerous for models.It is very easy to damage all small outer details of the painted model.But it is possible of course.A kind of paint remover depends on the sort of a paint that was used. For acrylic paint I suggest Wamod remover,Lifecolor and Agama.The Wamod one is the best in my opinion.
    There is a problem with oil enamels.It is very difficult to remove these dry ones.Humbrol, Revell etc.., don't offer any removers for these colours. It is possible to use the R-3 ( green) brake fluid.But the removing process lasts quite long and I suggest checking its influence on the model plastic ( leaving in the liquid a piece of a mould frame for one or two days, for example ).Also the fluid should remove these acrylic paints without any problem.
    Another liquid is the sodium lye ( I'm not sure if it is a correct name translation ).It is caustic liquid so it is very dangerous for our bodies especially eyes, skin.That's way there is the need to use protective glasses, rubbery gauntlets and rubbery apron.
    Finally it is possible to use the oil paint remover for artists like the one below.But I haven't checked it so far.
     

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  3. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    When it comes to oil-based enamel paints, Wojtek is quite right. A lot depends on the actual colour, and how long the paint has been on the model (in terms of months or years, not days). Different pigment grains and gauges are used in different colours, and it is often impossible to totally remove all traces of a particular colour. The reason is that these 'grains' tend to separate from the carrier when the paint is dissolving, and 'clump together', leaving groups of tiny, almost invisible, patches which don't show until painted over again. This tends to happen most often around raised detail, crevasses, engraved lines etc, however fine this detail might be.
    The caustic material will work, and one that Muller uses is a spray oven cleaner, called 'Mister Muscle' in Europe. I haven't used it myself, but I believe it works well.
    Again, the colours involved can have a bearing on what is required. If it is acceptable to remove most of the paint, leaving traces which are streaks, rather than lumps, which can be sanded smooth, then this might suffice.
     
  4. antoni

    antoni Banned

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    Aztec Concentrated Aorbrush Cleaner will remove acrylic or enamel paint, even if is's 20 years old. Soak for 24 hours and the paint will be softened and will pelel away. Can be reused. Comes in 1 liitre bottles.
     
  5. Wurger

    Wurger Siggy Master
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    A good info Antoni.THX for sharing.
     
  6. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Thanks Anrtoni, might come in handy!
     
  7. Hudson MkIII

    Hudson MkIII New Member

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    Simple Green General Purpose concentrate works well on acrylic paints. Soak for 10 hrs or so.
     
  8. snafud1

    snafud1 Member

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    Thanks for all the info guys!. Why I asked is because I tried Pine-Sol on 2 older models that had enamel paint. One cleared pretty well the other , the solvent/cleaner melted the fuselage . i figured plastic compound and thickness might make results vary also. Both models were Hobbycraft models. I will definitely check into all the above mentioned.(When I get time to work on them.) Oh and I used the Pine-Sol cause it works great on removing paint from my metal miniatures.
     
  9. Heinz

    Heinz Active Member

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    Would white spirit or metho be too damaging to plastics?
     
  10. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    White spirit is safe enough, it's what I use as a thinners, but it can take a long, long time if the paint has been on for some time.
     
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