RAF Bomber bases, lollie pops in 1/48th and 1/72 how small

Discussion in 'Building Questions, Tutorials and Guidebooks' started by ian lanc, Oct 30, 2008.

  1. ian lanc

    ian lanc Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2007
    Messages:
    702
    Likes Received:
    9
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Occupation:
    un-employed, i'm not bone, just injured my back at work
    Location:
    mansfield, nottinghamshire
    Hi all,

    Didn't know where to put this so here goes !!

    What size in inches or mm would 'LOLLIE POPS' be on RAF bomber bases ?? I've got to make one in 1/72nd and one 1/48th scale ! i did once see an article about scaled down lollie pops but can i heck as find it.

    any advice would be most grateful :p


    ian. :D
     
  2. Matt308

    Matt308 Glock Perfection
    Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2005
    Messages:
    20,140
    Likes Received:
    54
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Occupation:
    Engineer
    Location:
    Washington State
    I have no idea what you are referring to, Ian.
     
  3. ian lanc

    ian lanc Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2007
    Messages:
    702
    Likes Received:
    9
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Occupation:
    un-employed, i'm not bone, just injured my back at work
    Location:
    mansfield, nottinghamshire
    Hi Matt,

    I'm refering to the hard standing which where usually placed around the pirimeter track of airfields, this is a big circle of squared concrete and has a long extension of concrete which attaches to the peri' track,

    us brits call them lollie pops because they look just like that :lol:


    ian.
     
  4. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2008
    Messages:
    47,730
    Likes Received:
    1,425
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Cheshire, UK
    Ah! You mean 'Frying Pan' dispersals!
    Well, perimeter tracks were 50 feet wide, and the 'entrance' track to the dispersal pans were sometimes slightly narrower, about 40 feet. In 1/72 nd scale that's 6.66 inches, or 165mm. In 1/48th scale, it's 10 inches, or 250mm.
    The 'Frying Pan ' itself was approximately 100 feet in diameter, somtimes larger. So, in 1/72nd scale, that's 16.6 inches, or 450mm, and in 1/48th scale, it's a whopping 25 inches, or 625mm !
    If you're planning a display/diorama in 1/48th scale, it's going to be BIG!
    I know, I did it with the Tamiya 1/48th Lanc many years ago; to make it look not too crowded or stunted, the baseboard was nearly 3 feet by 3 feet!
    Before you commit yourself, check the airfield for the Squadron you are going to represent; many airfields had 'loop' disprsals, often called 'spectacle' dispersals, due to the positioning of two either side of the peri-track. They will be MUCH easier, and smaller, to build! If you need help, let me know, I have info on the layout and construction of all military airfields in the U.K during WW2.
    Terry.
     
  5. Matt308

    Matt308 Glock Perfection
    Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2005
    Messages:
    20,140
    Likes Received:
    54
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Occupation:
    Engineer
    Location:
    Washington State
    Hmm good to see that I'm not quite as ignorant as my wife says. Humbling.
     
  6. ian lanc

    ian lanc Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2007
    Messages:
    702
    Likes Received:
    9
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Occupation:
    un-employed, i'm not bone, just injured my back at work
    Location:
    mansfield, nottinghamshire
    Many thanks Terry, i'm building the Trumpeter 1/48th wellington at the moment and when its done it's to be put on a dio' in the shape of a lollie pop/frying pan :D more headaches !

    What size where the concrete squares any idea's

    Terry ! i'll keep you in mind as i'm building three bombers for a customer and he wants dio's for each one :shock:

    1/48th whimpy.... frying pan !!!! BIG :lol:
    1/72nd whitley..... i think whitley's where stored on the grass any idea's ??
    1/72nd wellesley... this one is to be shown having an engine change also on the grass.

    thanks.....ian.
     
  7. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2008
    Messages:
    47,730
    Likes Received:
    1,425
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Cheshire, UK
    Hi Ian. The concrete squares varied in size, depending on circumstances during building, I guess. On average, they were between 8 x8 feet and 12 x 12 feet, but don' take this as gospel, as some could be larger, or rectangular. Wimpey have a web-site about WW2 airfield construction, with lots of facts and figures; it might include this info, but I doubt it.
    As for aircraft on grass, again, that would depend on the airfield the type was based at during the period depicted. For instance, most bombers in the Wellington/ Whitley class up, were based on pre-war expansion period airfields which, although many still had grass runways, had hard peri-tracks and dispersal pans, and permanent hangars and buildings, eg Scampton, Dishforth etc. Note, however, there were a few exceptions. Airfields built during the war (bomber fields), all had hard-standings, due mainly to the increased weight of such types as the Lanc, Halifax and Stirling.
    The easiest way to ascertain what type of dispersal is needed for your dioramas is to let me know the following;
    Squadron, approximate date (month/year) and aircraft type.
    From that, I can provide you with the airfield name, a description of the hardstanding (if any), and probably a diagram or sketch of the latter, and possibly an airfield plan.
    It's no problem, as I have the referencexs to hand whilst working on my Diorama Guide. PM me with an e-mail address if it's easier for you.
    Terry.
     
Loading...

Share This Page