Sea mosquito on carriers

Discussion in 'Post-War' started by cormallen, Jan 14, 2009.

  1. cormallen

    cormallen New Member

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    Hi Folks,

    The Sea Mosquito is well known as the first RN (maybe anyone) plane to take off AND land on a carrier.

    The RN had more than fifty in service with several squdrons in the immediate post war period but...

    ...did they ever see any regular service on carriers?

    I am aware that they occasionally flew from them in training etc but were any operationally deployed onto carriers? They seem to have been shore based only...

    many thanks

    alan
     
  2. Heinz

    Heinz Active Member

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    I think the construction of them hindered the mossies being kept on carriers for too long. Also size of them probably being a problem.

    I know they handled well on carriers.
     
  3. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Hi Cormallen. I presume you meant the first MOSQUITO to land and take off?
    Anyway, I agree with Heinz. I'd have to check the details, but as far as I know, the 'navalized' Mosquito didn't see full service, as it ws trialled as a possible long-range 'heavy' fighter and fighter-bomber, but the war ended before they could be of use (in the Far East). Also, experience gained with Mosquitos in the CBI had showed that the type wasn't really suited to the climate, as the high temperatures and humidity affected the glues used in construction; this was thought to be a possible problem, together with the effects of a marine environment on-board ship. By the time development had been completed, the Hornet came into service, along with other types either about to enter service, or in final develeopment.
     
  4. cormallen

    cormallen New Member

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    Hi Folks,

    oops, yes I did mean the first twin engined ac to land/take-off...

    Many thanks for replies, they largely agree with my own research in suggesting the mosquito as only vaguely suitable for full service on carriers. I have seen several photos of variously broken mossies that have obviously found deck landing a bit traumatic for their wooden structure?

    Some of the sea mosquitos appear to have ended their days in rather brief service with the Israeli AF where they seem to have suffered some climate issues also...

    many thanks again.

    regards alan
     
  5. Heinz

    Heinz Active Member

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    Also the RAAF FB VI's we built in 44 and 45 suffered many structural failures due to the glue and wood suffering in the heat. This was also partly due to the building conditions not suiting the environment.

    Mostly the RAAF were operated from the top of Australia and later in Japan after the war. A very humid and damp climate was not at all suitable for the mossies.

    I've got some photos from a magazine somewhere about sea mosquito's I'll have a look for it.

    Cheers.
     
  6. HealzDevo

    HealzDevo Active Member

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    Interesting. Didn't know they tried to put a wooden frame aircraft on a carrier. Was this a problem with Inter-WW1 fighters as well? I just ask as I thought most of them had wooden frames covered with cloth or metal.
     
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