vintage prop question

Discussion in 'Aircraft Requests' started by mcemond, Mar 14, 2009.

  1. mcemond

    mcemond New Member

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    Hi
    Feel like a little bit of a leach jumping right in here like this but my question doesn't seem to break the forum rules i read earlier. Anyway, my grandfather flew in wwii with the RAF and got me started in a life long facination with that era of aviation. Even got a pilots license myself. I've always wanted a physical/ historical connection to him and that era of heroes and decided a while back that I would get a real vintage combat propeller from that era. Well, I'm still searching for that propeller but what I did want to ask was are there any more really out there or are they all post war propellers at this point? And how do you verify the age of a wwii era propeller?
    Thanks!
    Mike
     
  2. evangilder

    evangilder "Shooter"
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    It depends. There are some aluminum one that are probably older that are not used anymore floating around. I know the museum in Camarillo probably has at least 3-5 bent prop blades from various places. There is also and engine with the prop still on it that was recovered from the ocean, covered in barnacles.

    I cannot say about wooden ones. I have seen beat up wooden props in various shops, but have no way of telling their age. The certainly look old and beat up, but a good prop strike can cause it to get beat up.

    Are you searching for an entire prop, or a prop blade?
     
  3. mcemond

    mcemond New Member

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    Hi Thanks for your reply. I am actually looking for complete aluminum props making the search all the more challenging. We'll see though.
     
  4. evangilder

    evangilder "Shooter"
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    Not only challenging, but expensive and heavy, especially when you factor in the hub and multiple blades. If you are looking at something like a Corsair, the prop arc on that airplane with the three-bladed prop was 13 feet. I don't have the numbers in front of me, but I am pretty sure the four-bladed prop was even bigger.

    Depending on the area you live in, you could probably contact a local air museum and see if the have some that they have that are no longer usable. If not, they may know where to find one.
     
  5. mcemond

    mcemond New Member

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    Yeah. I think part of the fascination I have with these propellers is their amazing size. I remember the first time I saw a corsair in person and up close, the size of the prop absolutely amazed me. You just don't get that from looking at the pictures.
     
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