Who can help me identify this engine, it was recovered from the north sea.

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Bas

Recruit
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Aug 16, 2023
Who can help me to identify this engine recovered from the north sea. And indicate of which planes it was installed. Thank you in advance

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Well, it is a nine cylinder radial engine. The really odd thing about it is the the cylinder heads are all missing; you can see here they screwed on. I guess the heads could have corroded away, since they were most likely aluminum. The dome over the front of the engine is missing as well.

Measure the inside diameter of the cylinders and that would give a good guess at its displacement. The arrangement of the cylinder base mounting bolts will also be of value in determining the engine model, but I do not recognize it; it does look a bit like an R-1820, used on both the B-17 and early models of the Lockheed Hudson.
 
Well, it is a nine cylinder radial engine. The really odd thing about it is the the cylinder heads are all missing; you can see here they screwed on. I guess the heads could have corroded away, since they were most likely aluminum. The dome over the front of the engine is missing as well.

Measure the inside diameter of the cylinders and that would give a good guess at its displacement. The arrangement of the cylinder base mounting bolts will also be of value in determining the engine model, but I do not recognize it; it does look a bit like an R-1820, used on both the B-17 and early models of the Lockheed Hudson.
Thank you for the response, the engine does not have any tags on it anymore. The piston head is made of aluminum. And are corroded away. 1 fell out and I will measure the diameter to get an indication.

P. S. It was a three bladed propeller
 
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Perhaps a version of the Wright 1820 from a DC-2?

Head bolts grouped together in fours. https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/9a/Wright_R-1820_G.jpg
Wright R-1820 Cyclone - Wikipedia (Aircraft type used in at bottom, some by RAF, P-36, Hudson, etc..)

DC-2 prop with counterweights. https://storage.googleapis.com/mcp_acc_236blog/uploads/2015/02/DC2-Haan.jpg
Counterweights on a three blade prop is very 1930's ish.

This SBD-2P has the same type prop with counterweights and 1820 with four bolt pattern.
 
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The propeller hub is not the quick feathering type used on a B-17. I think that airframe can be ruled out at least.

The propeller hub is not the quick feathering type used on a B-17. I think that airframe can be ruled out at least.
Thank you all for the replies, it is really nice to see all the responses from you.

Some new information. The piston head is roughly 6 inch in diameter.
 
The propeller looks like a Hamilton Standard model 3E50 with Right Hand rotation, or a license-built copy. It also has a front bulkhead for a front spinner cover for the propeller.
The F2A did have a front spinner that looks similar to this. You can search the "F2A" in this forum to see the images.
 
The case does not look like a R1820 one nor are the fins on the cylinders. I'd guess it is a British or German engine. See if you can remove a bolt and check the thread - mm or inch.
 
The case does not look like a R1820 one nor are the fins on the cylinders. I'd guess it is a British or German engine. See if you can remove a bolt and check the thread - mm or inch.
Except that it's an exact match for an 1820 series.
 

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I note the OP gave the cylinder head size as "roughly" 6" in diameter.

Bristol Pegasus 9 cylinder radial had a cylinder bore of 5.75 inches. A lot of Hampdens and Wellingtons not to mention the odd Swordfish & Walrus went down in the North Sea.
 
I meant with roughly 2 mm deviation. On the piston head are still the metal rings
 
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I note the OP gave the cylinder head size as "roughly" 6" in diameter.

Bristol Pegasus 9 cylinder radial had a cylinder bore of 5.75 inches. A lot of Hampdens and Wellingtons not to mention the odd Swordfish & Walrus went down in the North Sea.

And the Wellybag had a spinner. We can discount the Swordfish and the Walrus as the propellers on those types don't match the photos of the recovered engine.
 
I note the OP gave the cylinder head size as "roughly" 6" in diameter.

Bristol Pegasus 9 cylinder radial had a cylinder bore of 5.75 inches. A lot of Hampdens and Wellingtons not to mention the odd Swordfish & Walrus went down in the North Sea.
The Pegasus uses a 3 bolt pattern for cylinder attachment not the 4 bolts as seen in the OP photo. The case thru bolts are different as well.
 

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