Winterized P-40

Discussion in 'Aviation' started by Marshall_Stack, Oct 6, 2010.

  1. Marshall_Stack

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    I was reading about the P-40s that were deployed up in the Aleutians during WW2. Thes planes were suposedly "winterized". I can't tell any difference externally other than that the exhaust flares looked different. Does anybody know what is done to planes to make them "winterized"?
     
  2. bobbysocks

    bobbysocks Well-Known Member

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    i am going to guess it was mostly having to do with heating the cockpit, canopy, and instruments...and providing more deicing properties. i did a quick check online and didnt come up with anything.
     
  3. billswagger

    billswagger Member

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    Probably includes adjustments to the oil cooler as well as thermostat settings.
    There might also be a different ratio used in the supercharger. I would expect that its not so much the flying in cold air because above 10,000ft the air temp is usually frigged anywhere you fly, but a plane that has to sit on the ground in cold weather probably also needs additives in the fluids to prevent freezing or loss of viscosity.
    There might also be additional equipment to help prime the engine when starting.

    and now... a gratuitous P-40 pic:

    [​IMG]


    Bill
     
  4. P-40K-5

    P-40K-5 Banned

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    they put a "boot" around the exhaust openings to prevent snow
    from getting inside the engine, different canopy seals, and SAE 70
    weight oil, also treadrd tires even for paived runways. they also
    used a "chiminey" from the exhaust manifold to the carb inlet.
    cabin always had provision for heated air. they had to keep oil
    dilution on for around 4mins.
     
  5. Matt308

    Matt308 Glock Perfection
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    ...Nitrogen to fill the tires and external heater/blower with duct work to keep the engine compartment warm.
     
  6. Marshall_Stack

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    Why did they use the nitrogen in the tires?
     
  7. Thorlifter

    Thorlifter Well-Known Member

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    I believe it's because Nitrogen doesn't expand and contract like air filled tires do.
     
  8. P-40K-5

    P-40K-5 Banned

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    also, moisture content in nitrogen is about 98% less then in
    air. keeps the schaeder valve assembly from freezing.
     
  9. bobbysocks

    bobbysocks Well-Known Member

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    and its a non-flammable gas...and while it wont act as a fire extinguisher it wont help perpetuate a tire fire. as far as winterization i wonder if they had a provision ( port or door) for a heater. the problems would be warming the oil and hydraulic fluids...keeping moisture and ice out of the pitot static system among others. the germans on the eastern front used to build small fires under tarps or drain the oil out of the ac and warm it.
     
  10. fastmongrel

    fastmongrel Well-Known Member

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    I think that must be a typo 70 weight oil in winter would virtually turn to a solid did you mean 10 weight oil.:confused:
     
  11. P-40K-5

    P-40K-5 Banned

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    no, I mean 70 weight. in hot weather the Allison V-1710 used 100-120 weight.

    they hit a switch to dilute the oil for up to 4mins for cold weather starting.
     
  12. fastmongrel

    fastmongrel Well-Known Member

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    I didnt realise they used such heavy grades of engine oil in aero engines. How did they dilute the oil did they use an engine oil pre-heater.

    A car engine trying to run SAE 120 would go through a lot of starter motors.:lol: The only time I have ever come across SAE 120 oil is Steam Cylinder Oil which we use in the Steam Engines I work on as a volunteer at my local heritage railway. Its very viscous and in cold weather you sometimes need to warm the oil can to get it to pour properly.
     
  13. tail end charlie

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    Perhaps they used the cunning ploy adopted by the British on Tempests...just dont let the motor go cold:cry:
     
  14. P-40K-5

    P-40K-5 Banned

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    with fuel oil, most probably kerosene. after the engines started, the fuel oil will get cycled out
    like water traps you find on some automotive diesel engines.

    they used such thick oil becouse frankly, 1940 engine technology sucked, oil refinery
    wasn't the greatest, oil of such viscosity has less of a chance of catching fire in the
    event of a catostrophic engine failior, and lastly, they wanted to eliminate any chance
    of bearing failor due to the loads the props put on the crankshaft.
     
  15. vikingBerserker

    vikingBerserker Well-Known Member

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    Wow, that's pretty interesting.
     
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