WWI Artillery....

Discussion in 'World War I' started by Lucky13, May 20, 2007.

  1. Lucky13

    Lucky13 Forum Mascot

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2006
    Messages:
    36,730
    Likes Received:
    1,064
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Nightshift picker
    Location:
    A Swede living in Glasgow, Scotland
    Home Page:
    Which was the best piece of artillery during WWI if you look at mobility, accuracy and firepower?
     
  2. trackend

    trackend Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2003
    Messages:
    4,039
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    Retired tech support railway engineer
    Location:
    Ipswich, Suffolk
    French 75
     
  3. HealzDevo

    HealzDevo Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2004
    Messages:
    1,345
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    Self-Employed
    Location:
    Queensland
    Don't really think I know that much about WW1 artillery...
     
  4. Glider

    Glider Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2005
    Messages:
    6,160
    Likes Received:
    128
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Consellor
    Location:
    Lincolnshire
    British 18 pounder. The French 75 fired to light a shell which is why the British 13 pd gun wasn't used more widely.
     
  5. trackend

    trackend Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2003
    Messages:
    4,039
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    Retired tech support railway engineer
    Location:
    Ipswich, Suffolk
    Over 20,000 75's where produced and although not a heavy shell it could fire 15 aimed rounds per min up until the introduction of the 75 in the late 1800's most artillery required re sighting after each round, the 75 had a recoil system that allowed all shots to stayed on target. By the end of WW1 improved ammo had increased the range to around 10000 yards.
    The weapon even lasted until WW2 being mounted on the M3 half track and the B25
     
  6. Joe2

    Joe2 Banned

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2006
    Messages:
    295
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Land of hope and Glory
    Agreed.
     

    Attached Files:

  7. comiso90

    comiso90 Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2006
    Messages:
    3,672
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    Video and multi-media communications expert
    Location:
    FL
    No doubt the French 75. The rate of fire was unprecidented and was the first truly modern piece of artillery
     
  8. Joe2

    Joe2 Banned

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2006
    Messages:
    295
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Land of hope and Glory
    The fact it went so long means it must be good...like the Lee-Enfield
     
  9. Glider

    Glider Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2005
    Messages:
    6,160
    Likes Received:
    128
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Consellor
    Location:
    Lincolnshire
    Sorry folks but the 75mm was a remarkable weapon in many ways but it didn't fire a big enough shell to do much damage to the German trenches. As we all know, WW1 was about trenches and for that reason it wouldn't make my list as being the best.

    Another first for the 75mm was it was basically copied and installed on the Lee Grant Tank.
     
  10. comiso90

    comiso90 Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2006
    Messages:
    3,672
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    Video and multi-media communications expert
    Location:
    FL
    "Best" has a lot of definitions... just like the "Greatest"..

    For me, the innovation of the gas cylinders earns it a place of distinction...

    The best shouldnt be defined by who killed the most people.
     
  11. HealzDevo

    HealzDevo Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2004
    Messages:
    1,345
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    Self-Employed
    Location:
    Queensland
    At least I mean the portable stuff. I know about the German Big Bertha which was such a massive gun and fired a massive round but it could hardly be described as portable...
     
  12. Glider

    Glider Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2005
    Messages:
    6,160
    Likes Received:
    128
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Consellor
    Location:
    Lincolnshire
    The thread is the best in WW1 not the best when it came out. I do agree the French 75 was a remarkable piece but for WW1 it was found wanting.

    As mentioned earlier, the British developed the 13pd which had a similar performance to the 75 but like the 75 was to small for WW1. So for WW1 then in my mind at least, the 18pd was a better weapon.
     
  13. Emac44

    Emac44 Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2006
    Messages:
    1,581
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    QR Train crew Guard
    Location:
    Brisbane Queensland
    I would say the use of artillery came into its own on another plain during WW1. Prior to its use before WW1. Such things as box barriage creeping barriage preparatary fire etc etc. Came into its own with development of not only the GUNS but on how it was used and with improvements in communications other than by courier or flags or bugles or even pidgeons as that had been used previously. You can single out which Gun may have been better or lacked this or that. But all weapons have good and bad points or lack this or that etc. But WW1 in my opinion was a Gunners War as far as artillery went. Its not so much the GUNS themselves but how they were used and the desired effects that were needed in a battle or how to support infantry or break up infantry when the need arose etc. The GUNS themselves could and were used not only as a moral boost but could break that moral in an enemy just as effectively as anything previously developed. More physcological breakdowns can occur under constant artillery fire and the casuality rate as far as battle field physcosis is well documented due to constant shelling on troops by a determined and well directed artillery fire. Even the sound of certain types of shells once fired can un-nerve the receipants of that fire it was directed or fired at etc. And of course the ARTILLERY usage continued into the next World War and same effects were recognised. So I am not going to debate which GUN was better but how it was used in effectiveness . Both the Allies and the German Austrians had great GUNS and used them effectively. And their usage came also with a another concept Anti Aircraft Artillery which was beginning to be used during WW1. The Gunners and hoiw the GUNS were used saw a need in Anti Aircraft Fire and thus new techniques were developed from older artillery practises. But to me the GUNS are useless unless there are improvements of communications to go along with the GUNS use. And WW1 saw the use of telephone lines of communication and constant updates of information from such things as aerial observation by either balloon or aircraft or more use of ground Foward Observers. These may have been primative at first and they were in accordance with our own technologies of today but without some type of targetting for the GUNS and filtering of information back to the Gunners etc. The Guns would be useless on a battle field if information wasn't available. So before you debate which GUN was Good or Bad etc. Take into account of how those GUNS were used and for what for
     
  14. peter benn

    peter benn New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2007
    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Occupation:
    mailman/editor
    Location:
    Toronto
    Speaking of the "creeping barrage," has anyone else seen that History Channel (??) clip of the British or Canadian large artillery gun rocking backward on its huge wheels with every recoil -- and a pair of soldiers shovelling dirt into the exposed wheel ruts with every pass? As if that was as good a way as any to make the "creeping" adjustment?

    Earplugs, like parachutes, were considered unimportant by the British. My maternal grandfather, a Lt. in charge of one gun, had tintinnitus for the next 50 years....
     
  15. trackend

    trackend Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2003
    Messages:
    4,039
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    Retired tech support railway engineer
    Location:
    Ipswich, Suffolk
    Agreed GL but it was a light field piece against just trenches the big Howitzers and Trench Mortars came into there own but for stemming attacks and the ability to move into new firing positions at short notice I still rate the 75 which meets two of the three criteria laid down in Lucky 13's original post as for fire power it is all relative to the target, a 8 inch howitzer will make a bloody big hole but lacks the fire power to stop advancing troops. A flank positoned MG slaughters them despite its small caliber IMO its different tools for different jobs so you can only compare fire power of say one howitzer to another howitzer and not different weapons.
    Having said all of that it's not to say I do not see your reasoning for not selecting the 75 but I just have a different take on it.
     
  16. Emac44

    Emac44 Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2006
    Messages:
    1,581
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    QR Train crew Guard
    Location:
    Brisbane Queensland
    Yes Peter seen many film clips of Artillery being used in WW1 on either History Channel or other resources like the Australian War Museum Canberra Australia. You mentioned about Gunners filling in wheel ruts after GUNS fired etc. Dont forget GUNS had to be relocated very often to avoid Counter Battery Fire and this was time consuming but necassary for the GUNNERS and Engineers to accomplish. More so if they wanted to keep the Battery hidden from sight or observation etc for the time being. You mentioned your Grand Father with Tintinnitus that was common with Gunners from WW1 and WW2. As were other injuires from handling hot shell casings after GUNS were fired. And the dangers of a misfire which occured on more than one occassion. Quality control of manufacturing of artillery shells wasn't a great priority during WW1 from what I have read. It was more of a case was to produce as many shells as possible regardless of the consquences not only on the battle front but also in the factory or armoury. Quiet a few artillery shells were more dangerous to the people making them or firing them, then to the enemy who would eventually were supposed to receive them in a bombardment etc. Read a few accounts were women in factories in England were either maimed or killed by shells exploding or shells fillings catching fire during manufacturing or poor work practises at the time in those factories
     
  17. trackend

    trackend Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2003
    Messages:
    4,039
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    Retired tech support railway engineer
    Location:
    Ipswich, Suffolk
    I agree EM although even during WW2 the quality varied considerably I like the Idea of the Soviets, instead of scraping them, using out of spect shells as war heads for there Katyusha's
     
  18. Emac44

    Emac44 Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2006
    Messages:
    1,581
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    QR Train crew Guard
    Location:
    Brisbane Queensland
    God Track Misfires in the GUNS are chilling. You hear and see the Lanyard being pulled and hear the firing mechanism work. Then nothing but a cold silence. You normally expect a very large bang. the Gun recoiling, But what you get is nothing. those misfires are bloody scarey. Because if that Gun still hasn't fired you know eventually that shell will have to be cleared from the breach. With the possiblity shell going off when breach is opened. Not something one wants to be around
     
  19. trackend

    trackend Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2003
    Messages:
    4,039
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Occupation:
    Retired tech support railway engineer
    Location:
    Ipswich, Suffolk
    Sounds like fun EM Id just us a 50 foot lanyard and send you back too open the breach
     
  20. Glider

    Glider Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2005
    Messages:
    6,160
    Likes Received:
    128
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Consellor
    Location:
    Lincolnshire
    I used to work with someone who did national service in the 1950s as a gunner on the Centurion. He described a misfire as the loneliest time of his life as the rest of the crew bailed out and left him to extract the dud shell. In the confined space of a tank turret he was almost totally terrified that a nudge or knock could set the thing off.
     
Loading...
Similar Threads
  1. Lucky13
    Replies:
    8
    Views:
    1,116
  2. Lucky13
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    1,758
  3. Matt308
    Replies:
    13
    Views:
    1,473
  4. Lucky13
    Replies:
    19
    Views:
    6,781
  5. Pisis
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    1,805

Share This Page