Aerobatics in a Ford Trimotor

Discussion in 'Aviation' started by GregP, Jan 16, 2016.

  1. GregP

    GregP Well-Known Member

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    #1 GregP, Jan 16, 2016
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2016
    I've posted a few aerobatic routines. Here's an unusual one:



    There is a "Part 2" that follows the first one. Didn't know the old Trimotor was quite so sprightly, myself, but it appears that it was able to be thrown about at will ... at least empty and at low speeds.
     
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  2. Marcel

    Marcel Well-Known Member

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    Great video! Yes I knew they did aerobatics with the trimotor, but never saw this footage.
     
  3. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Impressive !
    But I did think the next sub-title was going to read "And he crashes it" !
     
  4. Wildcat

    Wildcat Well-Known Member

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    Whoa, that was impressive!!
     
  5. GrauGeist

    GrauGeist Well-Known Member

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    I've flown in the EAA's Trimotor and several things stand out about it.

    First of all, it's remarkably quiet. Even for having three rounds.

    It also has great TO & landing qualities. It takes very little real estate to get up, even with a full load of passengers.

    The other noticible thing, is how smooth of a ride it has, even when we hit some turbulence.
     
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  6. GregP

    GregP Well-Known Member

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    We once had a Stout Bushmaster 2000 visit at Chino. Actually more than once. The Bushmaster is basically a "new build" Trimotor.

    I didn't get a ride, but watched it carefully and you are spot on, it LEAPS off the ground in a very short run.

    I'm almost laughing at the thought of a Ford Trimotor in the form of a Bushmaster with a glass panel and ADSB. Truly a mashup of modern and ancient in the same aircraft. If they had a GPS in the old Trimotor, we wouldn't have to wonder if Admiral Byrd ever really flew over the North Pole, would we?
     
  7. GrauGeist

    GrauGeist Well-Known Member

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    Did you know that the EAA's Trimotor was a barnstormer for a while?

    Between 1949 and 1973, it was used mainly as a Barnstormer (and did a brief tour as a crop duster and smoke jumper transport)

    The Trimotor featured in that video is a 4AT-B (the 53rd built), the EAA's Trimotor is a 4AT-E (the 69th built)
     
  8. GregP

    GregP Well-Known Member

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    Didn't know that, Graugeist. Thanks!

    Personally, I was most amazed at the snap-roll (looked like one to me, anyway) rather than anything else. But it seemed to have been well-behaved even in that maneuver. To me, the vertical tail always seemed a but small, but I see it was just the right size ...

    Another great plane if ever there was one. If I ever get another chance to ride in one, I'll take it.
     
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  9. GrauGeist

    GrauGeist Well-Known Member

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    Well, you missed out, because last year, the Trimotor made the west-coast route and was near Chino at one of it's SoCal stops.

    It'll be back, I'm sure - the EAA actually has two of them: 4AT-E and a 5AT-B.

    Might not hurt to keep an eye on their tour schedule page: Ford Tri-Motor Tour Stops | EAA
     
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  10. GregP

    GregP Well-Known Member

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    I saw it there in the pattern, but was going flying at the time in another aircraft. When we got down, rides were over.

    If you are an enthusiast, it's tough to mistake a Trimotor for anything else. Certainly sounded good climbing out. Three radials make a distinctive sound.
     
  11. GrauGeist

    GrauGeist Well-Known Member

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    If you want, have a look at my Trimotor thread from last year's visit here at RDD

    I got some great shots (inside and out)

    EAA Ford Trimotor visits Redding Airport (RDD)
     
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  12. GregP

    GregP Well-Known Member

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    Good shots, Graugeist!
     
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  13. GrauGeist

    GrauGeist Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, Greg!
     
  14. tyrodtom

    tyrodtom Well-Known Member

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    Byrd used a Fokker tri-motor on the artic expedition. It was named Josephine Ford after Edsel Ford's daughter. Byrd used a Ford tri-motor on his Antartic expedition
     
  15. GregP

    GregP Well-Known Member

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    Correct, wrong pole on my part.
     
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