Exaggerated panel lines and fasteners.

Discussion in 'Your Completed Kits' started by Sweb, Feb 27, 2009.

  1. Sweb

    Sweb Member

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    I've seen some beautiful work displayed with unbelievable attention to period accuracy and theatre weathering and it is extremely enjoyable for me to see such dedication. One thing I do notice though is the extreme pronunciation of panel lines and fastener detail. On some of the models I've seen the panel lines look to be easily 1/64th of an inch. On a 1/48th scale model the panel lines would be 48 times that at full size, or, 3/4" gaps between panels. Then there are some who cleverly employ the use of color to acquire scale separation and placement. I know the exaggerated detail has been used for some time, almost institutionalized in the how-to's of modeling rags, but it detracts from an otherwise museum quality effort. Just a pet peave of mine. Sorry if I'm causing any unraveling.
     
  2. Captain Dunsel

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    Take a look at some R/C scale models, especially sport scale, where the proportions, etc., are manipulated to make a better-flying model. As they're judged from a distance, the panel lines are often exaggerated drastically. Looks very dumb, but it's often what wins contests, as the judges often don't know better.

    CD
     
  3. Bill G.

    Bill G. Banned

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    I do judge at our local show and competition. And I just don't like the extreme panel lines. I agree that they are WAY out of scale! Many of these modelers have a fit is the wing span is 1/64 of an inch too something, or they will rescribe the entire model to get all the seams right. Yet they high light the seams so that you can see them a scale kilometer away!

    I light shading is fine. But some just are way too extreme for my tastes.

    Bill G.
     
  4. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    I agree about some modellers going 'over the top' with panel lines etc, as we've discussed recently. Strange how it mostly seems to be those that are the 'rivet counters', who will argue the toss about the colour shade being point twofive stages the wrong side of a Pantone scale, or FS colour spec, for example!
    Personally, I try to keep any panel lines and shading on my models as 'scale' as possible, and sometimes don't even add any 'enhancement', depending on aircraft type, scale etc.
    I normally try to work to a viewing distance of around 12 inches, or the equivalent for a full-frame picture of the model, depending on size/scale. At this distance in 1/48th scale, the distance in 'real life' would be, of course, 48 feet. If the panel lines show up drastically, other than those on certain aircraft that would be prominent on the actual aircraft, then I know I've overdone it. If done correctly, the lines should virtually disappear, apart from those mentioned above, and should become more visible the closer one gets to the model, particularly in photographs, as per the full-sized original.
    A (minor) problem with kits of some aircraft, is the way surface detail is presented. Normally, it's engraved (recessed) these days, and many shun the 'old fashioned' raised detail. However, quite often, a combination of these would be more appropriate, in order to give a more realistic likeness for a particular type, where panels might be butt-jointed, overlap and so on, unlike the relatively even, smooth surface of a model. This, of course, becomes more apparent the larger the scale, and I remember many years ago having a bit of a 'to do' with some 'know it all' about the way I had replicated some overlapping panels, by scratch-building, on a 1/32nd scale Spitfire. In his 'considerd opinion', it looked totally wrong, and couldn't possibly represent the real thing. After telling this particularly obnoxious individual that I had severe doubts as to the validity of his parentage, and suggesting that he remove himself in a particular fashion, I also suggested that he take the first opportunity to look closely at a real Spitfire! (I'd been informed that he had never even seen one close-up, whereas, at the time, I had just spent two airshow seasons working with four Spits!).
     
  5. Bill G.

    Bill G. Banned

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    EXACTLY!

    I saw a beautiful Bv-222 on this board. Well, until I saw the underside. You could see every panel seam and panel. And with the view of the camera, we are what, a 100 meters (scale) away!!!! Now I the readers, if there still was a Bv-222, or any large aircraft at that distance, are you going to see dark panel lines?

    I have seen modelers do so much work on a 1/32 jet fighter. But I am again standing that scale 100 meters plus away. All I am seeing is panel lines! All the hard work of making every little detail perfectly to scale, then ruin the effect with such glaring panel lines! I shouldn't be seeing the panel lines. I should just be seeing the color of the plane. Now if I get within 10cm of the plane, yes, I should get a feel of panel lines. But they shouldn't jump out at me.

    I model in HO (1/87) scale trains. I belong to a model railroad club. I have a personal rule about how detailed you should build something that is going to sit on the layout. I call it my arm rule. If I stand next to the layout and put my arm straight out over the layout, anything between me and my elbow should be highly detailed. Anything between my elbow and finger tips should be just moderately detailed. Everything beyond my finger tips doesn't need much detail. It is using scale distance and the ever decreasing lack of detail you see naturally to create a depth in the scene.

    I will scream if I ever see a 1/700 ship model where every seam on the hull sticks out like I see on some plane models!

    Bill G.
     
  6. lesofprimus

    lesofprimus Active Member

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    So guys, how do u think the panel lines on this crate look???
     

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  7. HoHun

    HoHun Active Member

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    Hi Les,

    >So guys, how do u think the panel lines on this crate look???

    Here is a real Fw 190 for comparison ...

    Regards,

    Henning (HoHun)
     

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  8. lesofprimus

    lesofprimus Active Member

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    The pic of the model is of a plane that was flying combat sorties everyday with a minimum of cleaning and upkeep...

    The pic u posted is of a museum piece, not a real comparison...
     
  9. HoHun

    HoHun Active Member

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    Hi Les,

    >The pic u posted is of a museum piece, not a real comparison...

    Not for the weathering maybe, but for the panel lines it should. Not that I know anything about modelling ...

    Regards,

    Henning (HoHun)
     
  10. Bill G.

    Bill G. Banned

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    To be fair, would you please provide a picture of the underside. I would like to see that before I comment.

    Bill G.
     
  11. lesofprimus

    lesofprimus Active Member

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    Here ya go Bill....
     

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  12. Wurger

    Wurger Siggy Master
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    According to my experience in modelling I can say that it is very hard to find a kind of balance between the effect of real weathering and the one it is made for models.In many cases a modeller is limited to a model accuracy.To tell the truth, how to make a panel line which is so thiny in realty.For instance, the panel line was of width 0.5mm. So for 1/72 scale it should be 0.5/72=0.0069444mm, for 1/32 scale it should be 0.015625mm. Looking at these numbers the thought is - can these thin lines be seen on a model or not ?
     
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