Falaise Typhoons

Discussion in 'Aviation' started by dirkpitt289, Feb 3, 2010.

  1. dirkpitt289

    dirkpitt289 Active Member

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    What better place to go to find out information about WWII aircraft then right here. :oops: I still haven't decided on a subject for the D-Day/ Invasion stripes Group Build. Seeing as there are already a number of P-51 Mustangs entered I thought I would try something different and something that was currently in my stash. Looking around I found that the Hawker Typhoon was involved in the D-Day invasion and I though this would be a Kewl subject. What little I found seems to surround the battle at Falaise where the Typhoons were equipped with under wing rockets. Most of the sights I found revolve around Paintings. Can someone turn me on to a website or a book (Still in publication) that could help me?

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  2. pbfoot

    pbfoot Active Member

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    #2 pbfoot, Feb 3, 2010
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2010
  3. B-17engineer

    B-17engineer Active Member

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    Will have a look throught some books Dirk I think I have a good picture of the rockets...
     
  4. B-17engineer

    B-17engineer Active Member

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    Here Dirk...
     

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  5. pbfoot

    pbfoot Active Member

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    I've just found I have a book called Typhoon and Tempest at War which I'll give you as it doesn't mention anything but RAF ops so to me its crap . Not a peep about anything except the Brits
     
  6. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    The Typhoon squadrons of the RAF, RAAF, RCAF, and RNZAF were formed into three (IIRC, will need to check) wings of the 2 TAF (2nd Tactical Air Force), and normally operated in conjunction; that is, one squadron would be bomb-equipped, supporting another squadron equipped with RP's. The latter weapons would be as required for the target or targets, that is HE, SAP(HE), or AP.
    There isn't enough space here to give you the full story, as the Typhoon was one of the main, if not the main, ground-attack aircraft employed in the Normandy campaign, gaining, or broadening, its reputation following the carnage that was the Falaise pocket. It may be surprising, but the percentage of actual (accurate) RP hits on targets at Falaise was very low, but the overall effect, in jamming the roads and lines of communication and, above all, on the moral of the German troops, was devastating.
    For your model, there are a number of books and publications covering the Typhoon operations, but one of the most concise and useful is the Warpaint series, 'Hawker Typhoon', which not only has a very good text and detail photographs, some in colour, but also has a wealth of accurate colour profiles, squadron listings etc etc.
    Although I won't be including it in the GB, I'm about to 'up-date' my 1/32nd scale conversion of the old Revell kit, built over 20 years ago, with the addition of a four-bladed prop and RP's, which I've eventually got after all these years! I believe Daniel will also be entering a 1/32nd scale example.
     
  7. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    I used to have that book Neil - never got it back after lending it to someone. I might be wrong, but I seem to recall that the three RCAF Typhoon squadrons which formed 143 Wing, 2 TAF, were indeed mentioned as an overall part of the description of the work of 2 TAF, as the other squadrons were similary covered, that is, as 2 TAF, not individual squadron descriptions. The very nature of 2 TAF, and the Typhoon squadrons in particular, meant that quite often an operation could be made up of aircraft from more than one sqaudron, intermingled as one Flight or Section, for example. To you, the book might be 'crap', but overall, it's a rather good reference to the Typhoon and Tempest, and the pilots, of whichever nation.
     
  8. pbfoot

    pbfoot Active Member

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    #8 pbfoot, Feb 3, 2010
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2010
    not that I can find even a ref to 486 RNZAF almost every pic has the letters PR but not one mention of an RCAF Squadrons , birds or personel. IMO its a Roland Beamont scrap book. The book has moved into my kindling pile for the fire pit in my back yard
     
  9. dirkpitt289

    dirkpitt289 Active Member

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    Sounds good...
     
  10. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    I do seem to remember that there was a lot of RPB's stuff in the book Neil ! However, it was one of the first, if not the first, of the 'At War' series, dating back to the early 1970's, and at that time RPB had just published an account of Typhoon ops etc, as well as his Test Pilot book (Testing Years). I believe a lot of the 'bulk' of the book was provided by him, as a means to launch the series. Since then, many things have changed, and much more information is now available. Very recently I started assembling info on the Typhoon and Tempest for one of my projects, and was quite surprised at the amount of relatively new material now available, compared with only a few years ago.
     
  11. B-17engineer

    B-17engineer Active Member

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    Interesting picture.
     

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  12. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Nice pic H. Notice how ragged and worn the AEAF stripes are, showing the temporary paint. Nothing like most models of the Typhoon !!
     
  13. B-17engineer

    B-17engineer Active Member

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    Thanks Terry. I sent an email to Dirk with info from a book...

    Does this info sound correct T?

    "As soon as the Allied troops landed on the beaches in Normandy on 6 June 1944, 18 Typhoon squadrons (11 RP-firing and 7 bomb carrying) were available to support the assault. As a prelude to the allied landings, Typhoons of No.98 and 609 Squadrons had attacked and destroyed an enemy radar station at Dieppe/ Caudecote on 2 June; this installation would have given the Germans advance warning of the invasion fleet. The first call for help on 6 June came at 07.34 hours when the 21st army group requested an attack on the HQ 84th Corps at Chateau La Meauffe, near St. Lo, and a squadron of 'Bombphoons' was dispatched whereupon it destroyed the target, killing most of it's occupants. Three days later, on 9 June, Typhoons of Nos. 174, 175, and 245 squadrons destroyed the Joubourg radar installation which virtually overlooked the beacheads in Normandy. Upon returning to England, the Typhoon squadrons were placed on alert, where they were available for direction by each Royal Navy HQ ship, anchored offshore, in case special targets needed attention. Another nine squadrons were on hand to attack military HQs, defend localities and enemy gun batteries. Two others, No.137 and 263 Squadrons of Air Defense of of Great Britain (ADGB), operated over the English Channel (One at each end.) to engage enemy naval vessels, in particular, E-Boats, which (it was anticipated) would be attempting to enter the area to attack Allied landing craft. On D-Day squadrons took off prior to the landings, searching for fast patrol boats. Throughout the day Typhoons attack German targets, often at the request of friendly troops on the ground. There had been two surprises during the daylight hours - the lack of expected fierce Wehrmacht response and reinforcement, and the almost complete absence of the Luftwaffe, although Typhoon pilots had enough targets to keep themselves busy. On the afternoon of 7 June, a call for aerial support came form the British 61st Brigade for its attack on Port En Bessin. Not long after this, reports were received of Allied troops being bombed, but investigations revealed that is was Typhoon drop tanks, and not bombs, that were landing among them. Typhoon pilots had released the cumbersome tanks in an effort to increase the aircraft speed before striking the targets around the port.

    As the Allied armies broke out of the northern perimeter in France, more Typhoons operated close to the advancing forces, and a new tactic-the development of close-air support-was devised. Typhoon pilots were instructed to maintain a standing patrol, or 'cab rank' at about 10,000 feet over the battle area; the aircraft would then be called down by an RAF officer accompanying the land forces to strike any convenient target with guns, bombs, and rockets as the need arose. This method was greatly appreciated by Allied troops embroiled the numerous firefights within the maze of narrow lanes of the Normandy countryside. "
     
  14. Milosh

    Milosh Well-Known Member

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  15. Airframes

    Airframes Benevolens Magister

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    Useful link there Milosh.
    Yes H, that's good stuff giving a basic overview of the coverage on D-Day and the first stages of the Normandy campaign. The 'cab rank' system stayed in operation more or less throughout the rest of the year, as the Allies advanced, with the Typhoons then operating from forward bases on the Continent, and moving from airfield to airfield as the advance continued. A reasonably good example of how 'cab rank' worked was shown in the movie 'A Bridge too Far' - even though Harvards portrayed the Typhoons!
     
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