Flammöl weapons

Discussion in 'Aviation' started by davebender, Jul 21, 2012.

  1. davebender

    davebender Well-Known Member

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    The German Army used flame fuel in flame throwers and artillery rockets from 1916 onward. Why didn't the Luftwaffe use napalm? It's the same stuff but loaded into a bomb casing. Flammöl is dirt cheap to make yet highly effective. Exactly the type of weapon WWII Germany needed.
     
  2. tyrodtom

    tyrodtom Well-Known Member

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    Napalm doesn't have to be made of gasoline, but it does have to be made of some kind of refined petrolum, or a synthectic.
    Germany just didn't have a lot of excess petrol.
     
  3. davebender

    davebender Well-Known Member

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    WWII Germany didn't have a lot of excess anything except coal, steel and aluminum.

    Flame fuel can be made from low grade petroleum residue. The junk remaining behind from the production of motor fuel and aviation gasoline. In a pinch you could probably also use a certain percentage of crude oil. That makes it inexpensive compared to high explosives used for conventional bombs and artillery shells.
     
  4. Erich

    Erich the old Sage
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    continue your search Dave since the LW did use carriers/oil bombs similar to our Naphlam on the Ost front
     
  5. Shortround6

    Shortround6 Well-Known Member

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    While gasoline may be a little thin for best use trying to use "The junk remaining behind from the production of motor fuel and aviation gasoline" is also going to give less than desirable results. Some of the "Junk" being things like asphalt. even Bunker "C" (fuel oil for ships) may just act like a big rock at times. Many ships and some stationary power plants ran steam lines through the oil tanks to make sure the stuff would flow at low temperatures.

    Being able to burn isn't good enough. A certain amount of dispersal and ease of ignition is also required, and at different temperatures.
     
  6. davebender

    davebender Well-Known Member

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    First I've heard of that. Do you have details of the weapons employed?
     
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